Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noted that the nickel seems to wear on the frame, most noticeably right above the trigger guard, because the trigger guard exhibits no extensive wear and the demarcation is distinct.

Here is one for sale currently, at $6500:

Colt Frontier Six Shooter Etched Panel .44-40 Caliber Revolver for sale.

This one dates from 1882.

And, attached are photographs of one I own dating from 1889 that exhibits a similar pattern of wear.

Why is this so?
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
If you're right handed you would put the gun in the left hand to load.

If you're wearing a wedding band it would be about in the same spot as the wear on the gun.

Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,796 Posts
I've always thought most of the nickel wear on BP guns (and the blued guns as well) came from the corrisive BP residue. End of the barrel, front of the cylinder and the front of the frame just forward of the cylinder is where most of occurs and pops the nickel plate off. Reloading with the gun held in your left hand for right handed shooters sure makes sense why there is wear on the frame there. Left hand would have BP residue on it while shooting and reloading the gun. Still doesn't answer why no wear on the trigger guard though. I would bet the difference in the case hardened surface of the frame and the softer trigger guard metal is why you see a "line" of nickel plate failure. Difference in metallurgy between the two parts how well the nickel plating adheres I'd bet is the answer. Would speculate it would be the same answer on the screws and how they were heat treated.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've always thought most of the nickel wear on BP guns (and the blued guns as well) came from the corrisive BP residue. End of the barrel, front of the cylinder and the front of the frame just forward of the cylinder is where most of occurs and pops the nickel plate off. Reloading with the gun held in your left hand for right handed shooters sure makes sense why there is wear on the frame there. Left hand would have BP residue on it while shooting and reloading the gun. Still doesn't answer why no wear on the trigger guard though. I would bet the difference in the case hardened surface of the frame and the softer trigger guard metal is why you see a "line" of nickel plate failure. Difference in metallurgy between the two parts how well the nickel plating adheres I'd bet is the answer. Would speculate it would be the same answer on the screws and how they were heat treated.

That's about as plausible explanation as any. It is on both sides, so being right or left handed wouldn't explain it. Also, that wouldn't explain the demarcation in wear exactly between the trigger guard and frame. It has to be the metallurgy of the frame and trigger guard, such that nickel adheres better, or is more durable, when applied to the trigger guard vs the frame.

Thank you for posting the photograph. The link no longer works probably because it appears this revolver may have sold at the black Friday sale earlier today with 20% discount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
HIJACK!: Note the frame on Hans's gun and the etched panel. In front of the cylinder at the cylinder pin. Rounded on etched panel, "fluted" on Hans. (?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I like STARVATIONS wedding band theory.
While loading and unloading (as a right handed person) that's precisely where the wedding band would hit. Try it.
Yes, but it cannot be that. The demarcation would not coincide exactly with the interface between the frame and trigger guard.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top