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I am buying another python from Italy to be sent to me in Germany. I was arranging to have the gun sent to my LGS and do the transfer once he had it in his book. It turns out that as long as I get the import permit and put the gun on my license first at the local city hall, the seller can mail the gun directly to my door. That is from one country to another. Try that across State lines back home.
 

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That's simply amazing!
Vic
 

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Kinda funny and not in a good way. Didn't we have a serious dust up with Italy and Germany some time back? And now it is easier to transfer a hand gun from one to the other? And damn hard to just own one, let alone buy one in Canada?

Seems mighty odd how things have changed since 1945.
 

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Harumph!
Anyone would think such would be the case in the land of the free & the home of the brave.
Nope.
Punish the legitimate commerce in firearms and just ignore the criminal.
After all, thugs and criminals have to eat too........
Bernie Goetz was right.
 

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To a European, living in the open market of the EU, the US has some crazy laws, and not just firearms related. For example, having to get a new drivers license when moving to another state, different sales tax laws, Federal vs State Laws, etc, etc. Not saying they're wrong or bad, but from a European perspective just 'strange'
Having said that, firearms laws in certain European countries (especially the UK) and very prohibitive.
 

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I am buying another python from Italy to be sent to me in Germany. I was arranging to have the gun sent to my LGS and do the transfer once he had it in his book. It turns out that as long as I get the import permit and put the gun on my license first at the local city hall, the seller can mail the gun directly to my door. That is from one country to another. Try that across State lines back home.
Oh, just stop it!!! Envy is a sin.
Anyway, it turns out that the US has suffered from 'regulatory creep' after WWII - beginning in the 60s when assassination became the malcontent's form of expression. Today, our laws do not hold up all that well in comparison with some other nations.
Oh, and the crimes that our thousands of gun laws were "supposed to" prevent? They've gotten worse. That horrible old human heart seems to find a way to murder regardless of the law.
 
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To a European, living in the open market of the EU, the US has some crazy laws, and not just firearms related. For example, having to get a new drivers license when moving to another state, different sales tax laws, Federal vs State Laws, etc, etc. Not saying they're wrong or bad, but from a European perspective just 'strange'
Having said that, firearms laws in certain European countries (especially the UK) and very prohibitive.
Those states are much like separate countries. I think that many people still relate 1st as being a citizen of their state, and 2nd as a citizen of the USA. Each state used to have its own personality, accent, traditions, customs - some called a subdivision of a state a "County", and others maybe a "Parish".

After the American Revolution, the 13 original states were under the Articles of Confederation 1781-88. The Articles of Confederation gave the states too much power, and this form of government failed. One reason for failure was that only the states had the power to levy taxes. The central government had no power to tax. The U.S. Constitution (1789+) tried to specify the powers that the states and central government could exercise. Through clever devices over the years, the central government has been taking more and more rights away from the states. And this has caused much political friction. The Civil War was fought largely over States Rights. The Civil War ended slavery, but settled little regarding states rights. And thus we continue with states being operated as separate countries to some degree.
 

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Good comment.

Folks like to rewrite history to fit their view of the world. But like it or not this is fact.
The Civil War was fought largely over States Rights. The Civil War ended slavery, but settled little regarding states rights.
 

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Those states are much like separate countries. I think that many people still relate 1st as being a citizen of their state, and 2nd as a citizen of the USA. Each state used to have its own personality, accent, traditions, customs - some called a subdivision of a state a "County", and others maybe a "Parish".

After the American Revolution, the 13 original states were under the Articles of Confederation 1781-88. The Articles of Confederation gave the states too much power, and this form of government failed. One reason for failure was that only the states had the power to levy taxes. The central government had no power to tax. The U.S. Constitution (1789+) tried to specify the powers that the states and central government could exercise. Through clever devices over the years, the central government has been taking more and more rights away from the states. And this has caused much political friction. The Civil War was fought largely over States Rights. The Civil War ended slavery, but settled little regarding states rights. And thus we continue with states being operated as separate countries to some degree.
That is something that some Europeans cannot understand, especially since the EU or Common Market, came into force. One can travel across many countries over there without a passport, trade freely and work in other EU countries. I have sat at many dinner tables in Europe, at company events, where folks try to understand the American psyche. All too often I defended such comments as "The Americans; their houses are too big, their cars are too big, they have too many guns, etc,etc. As a Brit, they expected me to agree, but as a Brit who came to the US 31 years ago, married an American and loves it here, I always stood up for my adopted homeland!
 
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