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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had a flood at our club and water entered the metal lockers where I kept hundreds of rounds of 9mm ammo. About 8 50-round boxes got wet, I don't know if they were soaked or just sprayed with water. All boxes were horizontal and the plastic cartridge racks contained ammo with the bullets pointing down.

Is it safe to let them air out, dry and use them? I suspect the worst that can happen are squib fires, but that might ruin my barrel. Any suggestions?
 

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While not Water Proof...most Mil-Spec Ammo is Water "Resistant".

Since you did not mention the brand name of the ammo...

Did not mention how long they were exposed to the water... ( "soaked"...submerged for hours / days..."or just sprayed" ( flooded...doesn't sound like "sprayed" ?! )

My 2 cents...I myself would NOT try to air dry them out and use them...

As a squib could not only get lodged in the barrel...but could bulge / burst the barrel...and/or injure the shooter besides.

Is your safety...and your expensive firearm...worth that chance !? ...for $15 a box ammo.
 

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A squib round can lodge in the barrel, but it will not bulge or burst the barrel because it does not even have enough power to push the bullet out of the barrel. Damage could result if another non-squib round is fired while the squib bullet is still in the barrel.

Shoot the ammunition, but pay attention to the report and note whether there is a bullet strike after each shot.
 

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well if were me...and it is just 9mm and just 8 boxes....i would toss them...better to be safe than sorry....not worth the risk
 

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Back during the "first" ammo shortage of '09, I purchased 1,000 rounds of surplus Israeli 7.62 X 51. The ammo was packed in 4 plastic bags of 250 rounds each.

When I started to get multiple misfires, I first thought of light strikes, but the primers had deep firing pin indentions. I looked at the ammo a little closer and found a little, green, oxidation around some of the primers. Thank goodness I only found suspect cartridges in one of the 250 round bags. When I pulled the bullets on those cartridges with a little green around the primers, I discovered the powder had clumped. Apparently it had been submerged for quite some time because the sealant around the primers and bullets was still intact.

Then, after pulling the bullets out of all of the suspect rounds I chambered each empty case and "pulled the trigger". All of the primers failed to go bang.

Not all ammo is manufactured with the same care. If not surplus ammo, it does not have sealed primers and bullets, however, by design modern ammunition is manufactured to very close tolerances, and is pretty damned water tight.

Also since modern ammunition is constructed with very tight tolerances, if there was water intrusion, it would take a long time for a wet primer to dry and probably even longer for wet powder to dry. So, if I were faced with your situation, I would pull a few bullets, probably from the boxes that were on the bottom and see if the powder looked like it had been wet, and even fire off the primers.

Unless the rounds were completely submerged for some time, I highly doubt they have been compromised. If you pull a few bullets from the cartridges and find that the powder looks dry, and if the primers on those rounds will fire, I doubt they have been compromised.

If you have ever experienced a squib, whether the round was constructed with only a primer, or a light powder charge, you have felt that the recoil is noticeably reduced, and the normal boom turn into more of a pop. If you do get a squib, just take a hammer and a cleaning rod and carefully drive the lodged bullet back out the way it came.

Therefore, I submit, that with a little extra care, both in inspecting, and using the suspect ammo, you will find the ammo to be useable.

YMMV.
 

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I agree that you are going to take a chance and may have some (misfires) fail to fire and squibs, however I would shoot them being extra aware of the report, recoil and target strikes. Your call. I don't think it is inherently dangerous per se, kind of like firing ammo from a newbee reloader or from a newly acquired press. Would much rather have misfires than double loads.
 

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Hey maybe i am just cautious....wet ammo equals problems and 9mm is so cheap...why take a chance?

Sent from my LGL41C using Tapatalk
 
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Yea jringo8769...I'm not going to tell a novice to go ahead and use them...especially when the circumstances the OP described are kinda hazy.

{ ie: "flood at our club" / "don't know if they were soaked or just sprayed with water" }

I would err on the side of caution...
 

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Duty ammunition gets wet on duty belts all the time. There is/has been no alert in the LEO community to toss it.

I bet dogface got wet once or twice. :confused:
 

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Agreed, but..."wet" is one thing.

Submerged in a "flooded locker" for who knows how long ( per the OP ) is another...

Some manufacturers seal the primer, some don't...some crimp the bullet, some don't...

and we all know what happens if you don't "keep your powder dry"
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for all the information. I'm not sure how much water got into the ammo from this leak, but will consider all the replies seriously.
 

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Finally...the OP

Can you tell us what brand ammo...how long in water before you touched it...fully submerged or just "sprayed"...!?

is the primer sealed...?! ( usually red on or around the primer )

Thanks
 

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Run it.
There might be some duds.
There may be some squibs.
I would bet they all go 'bang' as God intended.

I have been known to disassemble suspect ammo and re-purpose the primed cases & bullets.
The suspect rounds were mongrel reloads, and the re-purposed components ran just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Finally...the OP

Can you tell us what brand ammo...how long in water before you touched it...fully submerged or just "sprayed"...!?

is the primer sealed...?! ( usually red on or around the primer

Thanks
Speer Lawman Cleanfire .45ACP 230 gr FMJ.
Hard to know how much water leaked into the locker from above. All I know is that 16 boxes out of 40 in the locker were wet, cardboard box and some of the ammo was visibly wet.
 

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Ha...I got 500 rounds of the Speer Lawman 45 Auto 230 Grain TMJ (Total Metal Jacket) CLEAN FIRE SKU:53885

The following is from the manufacturer:

Please note that Speer Lawman CLEAN FIRE uses a lead free primer.

Occasionally you will find sealant on the brass casing. This is normal and will not affect performance.

Hence the primer is sealed...and should be good to go for firing if it wasn't submerged for hours.



Specifications:
•Caliber: .45 ACP
•Bullet Type: Total Metal Jacket (TMJ)
•Bullet Weight: 230 Grain
•Bullet Casing: Brass, Reloadable
•Bullet Primer: Boxer, Non-Corrosive
•Muzzle Energy: 365 ft lbs
•Muzzle Velocity: 845 fps
•Made in the USA by CCI/Speer
•Manf. Part #: 53885
 

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No ammunition is "water proof". Keep in mind that no ammo company or manufacturer provides a guarantee against water intrusion or even 100% firing, just reasonable care in manufacture.
 
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