Colt Forum banner
41 - 60 of 79 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
322 Posts
About 10 years ago, plus or minus, I was at a close family friends get together and chatted up things with a gent I met there about all things Alaska, outdoors, flying, guns and more. Turns out he's quite the accomplished pilot. Also turned out he's an actual Earp. Was pretty cool to think I was having a drink and chatting with a direct lineage Earp. And no, he didn't happen to own any guns used by his ancestors. Bummer.
Cool! Which Earp brother was he descended from??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,721 Posts
Cool! Which Earp brother was he descended from??
I honestly don't know. He outlined the lineage chain for me at the time but I don't remember. I don't think it was a straight shot from any of the three famous brothers, as I don't think a few even had kids. He's a cousin from some branch off but still close enough to maintain the paternal Earp last name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,259 Posts
My 2cents

The spicer hearing transcripts exist and Wyatt testified that after encountering Behan who told the Earps he had disarmed the Clanton/McLowery’s that he (Wyatt) placed his pistol that was in his hand in his coat pocket...IMO whatever pistol he had (Colt smith Wesson Merwin Hulbert, Remington) had a standard barrel length for that time which was typically 7-1/2” ... I see no practical advantage in Earp carrying a 10-12” barreled revolver... in fact it would be a disadvantage.... The spicer hearing transcripts do document the serial numbers of both Frank Mclowry and Billy Clinton’s pistols... both appear to have been Colt frontier six shooters 44-40 with 7-1/2” barrels from their serial numbers ( I don’t believe those guns are in anyone’s collections

The long barrel claim is a myth invented by a writer just like Hollywood later invented the myth that the Cochise county cowboy gang all wore red sash’s ... this is also totally made up, yet I see reenactors wearing a red sash on the street of Tombstone frequently.
Do you happen to know the serial numbers of the Frank McLowry and Billy Clanton SAAs?

Best regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
Do you happen to know the serial numbers of the Frank McLowry and Billy Clanton SAAs?

Best regards,
Frank McLaury's, Colt's Frontier Six-Shooter, serial number 45,338 shipped to J. P. Moore's & Son's NY, New York, on September 27, 1878.
1 of 50 in the shipment.

Billy Clanton's, Colt's Frontier Six-Shooter serial number 52,196 sent to Simmons Hardware Company St. Louis, MO on July 19, 1879.
1 of 25 in the shipment.

They happen to be the only firearms that can be absolutely verified and documented as to having been used in the Tombstone street fight, they were recorded by Coroner H. M. Matthews.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,340 Posts
I find these shipped to points very interesting. Think about how many collectors try to find Colts shipped to "interesting places or historic people". No one pays up for a SAA shipped to "just a hardware store." But I've always figured, most....almost ALL were shipped to the big hardware stores, even if they went next to a buyer in Dodge City, Tombstone, Deadwood, or all these famous old west towns people dream of. Frontier buyers seldom made a gun order, just like buyers seldom do today. For every gun ordered and shipped to a person, or small general store in an old west town, there were hundreds shipped to large retails stores in the midwest and up North. From there....dealers would bring them down to the Southwest to resell. That's why it's so rare to find a gun shipped to these places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
I find these shipped to points very interesting. Think about how many collectors try to find Colts shipped to "interesting places or historic people". No one pays up for a SAA shipped to "just a hardware store." But I've always figured, most....almost ALL were shipped to the big hardware stores, even if they went next to a buyer in Dodge City, Tombstone, Deadwood, or all these famous old west towns people dream of. Frontier buyers seldom made a gun order, just like buyers seldom do today. For every gun ordered and shipped to a person, or small general store in an old west town, there were hundreds shipped to large retails stores in the midwest and up North. From there....dealers would bring them down to the Southwest to resell. That's why it's so rare to find a gun shipped to these places.
True! I have a S&W Military and Police revolver that came from the Union Pacific Railroad. The letter shows it was shipped to a sporting goods store in Salt Lake City.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
I have a couple of Ubertis that Wyatt would have used at the OKC. I can sell them cheap. Nickel (movie version) or blue and case :) Got some of Bat's and Doc's guns here too. Should open me a museum I guess. :cool:
We'll pool together on that museum . I took this picture before sunrise . A week before Wyatts wedding anniversary in Nome he pissed away his allowance and plumb forgot . Well , this is the gift to his wife for her claim up from the shore . There is still remains of a shack there minus one shovel . Kinda like a toaster gift today .:sneaky:
Wood Rectangle Tool Wood stain Hardwood
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wes Terner

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Historical identification is a tricky proposition, even in the information age, which the late 19th century certainly was.

Wyatt Earp was stopped when a bulge under his coat revealed he was carrying a concealed weapon as he entered the ring to referee the highly anticipated heavyweight match between Sharkey and Fitzsimmons in San Francisco, December 3rd, 1896. Earp's decision awarding the fight and $10,000 purse to Sharkey was very unpopular. Earp tried to exculpate himself later by noting he was slightly acquainted with loser Fitzsimmons, having met him through Bat Masterson, several years previous.

It didn't sooth the angry fans. The SF Call (publication date Dec. 3rd) newspaper was unable to curb the vitriol as it referred to the ref, arrested the next day on the weapons charge, as the "slouchy" (because he "sneaked" from the ring after his decision) "alleged gun-fighter" who "showed the yellow-dog in him by going into the ring with a Colt's Navy revolver in his pocket ..."

And there's the rub. What was Wyatt carrying? The Sacramento Record-Union the next day referred to the "frontier Colt’s,’ 45-caliber, single action." And to further muddy the waters the Call, also on the 4th, changed its tune. They now, too, said Earp had been carrying a "45-caliber, single action," with the additional information that the Colt was "about twelve inches long, with an eight-inch barrel." They helpfully included the illustration shown below. What is it? I have no idea. Author Allen Barra (Inventing Wyatt Earp) notes that Stuart Lake said Earp took a Buntline Special to the fight. Barra himself speculates it may have been some model of S&W.

Wyatt turned himself in on the 4th, posted $50 cash bail and said he would be in court the next day.

Trigger Revolver Gun barrel Air gun Gun accessory


Note: All quotes and the image are from the Library of Congress Chronicling America web site of scanned newspapers. I searched the boxers' and Earp's names for the noted dates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
Good search , thanks . It seams the news guys really haven't changed much over the years .
You would have thought that the arresting officer/officers would have listed the type of weapon “Colt” and its identifying marks (serial number) upon his arrest record! If so the San Francisco PD records would have it?
Or not! I own Virgil Earps last will and testament prior to his leaving for Goldfield Nevada where he leaves everything to his wife Allie, this is from the original records filed in San Bernardino Co. records.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
Not to be argumentative, but I believe the records do show that he died in Goldfield Nevada at least as my poor memory leaves me believe!
You are correct.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wes Terner

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
You are correct.
Also would you believe He is buried in Oregon”Portland” I believe due to his relative claiming his body at death and removing it to a place he had only been to once!
not to his family internship at Colton. Whereas Wyatt is buried in the Colma cemetery south of San Francisco in his “wife’s“ family plot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
Historical identification is a tricky proposition, even in the information age, which the late 19th century certainly was.

Wyatt Earp was stopped when a bulge under his coat revealed he was carrying a concealed weapon as he entered the ring to referee the highly anticipated heavyweight match between Sharkey and Fitzsimmons in San Francisco, December 3rd, 1896. Earp's decision awarding the fight and $10,000 purse to Sharkey was very unpopular. Earp tried to exculpate himself later by noting he was slightly acquainted with loser Fitzsimmons, having met him through Bat Masterson, several years previous.

It didn't sooth the angry fans. The SF Call (publication date Dec. 3rd) newspaper was unable to curb the vitriol as it referred to the ref, arrested the next day on the weapons charge, as the "slouchy" (because he "sneaked" from the ring after his decision) "alleged gun-fighter" who "showed the yellow-dog in him by going into the ring with a Colt's Navy revolver in his pocket ..."

And there's the rub. What was Wyatt carrying? The Sacramento Record-Union the next day referred to the "frontier Colt’s,’ 45-caliber, single action." And to further muddy the waters the Call, also on the 4th, changed its tune. They now, too, said Earp had been carrying a "45-caliber, single action," with the additional information that the Colt was "about twelve inches long, with an eight-inch barrel." They helpfully included the illustration shown below. What is it? I have no idea. Author Allen Barra (Inventing Wyatt Earp) notes that Stuart Lake said Earp took a Buntline Special to the fight. Barra himself speculates it may have been some model of S&W.

Wyatt turned himself in on the 4th, posted $50 cash bail and said he would be in court the next day.

View attachment 766936

Note: All quotes and the image are from the Library of Congress Chronicling America web site of scanned newspapers. I searched the boxers' and Earp's names for the noted dates.
The quote from the SF Call says he had a Colts Navy revolver. That drawing looks like a Colts Navy drawn by someone who doesn't know a thing about guns. Not much has changed with the media not knowing anything about guns
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
The revolver in the illustration most resembles the Colt Navy model 1889, with no cutouts for a cylinder stop. Except it shows the horsey of the Army model grips. And of course, the trigger is too far back for double action. Who knows what the artist was looking at?

Maybe the original call of Navy Colt was correct, and Wyatt was up to date with a "self-cocker." Of course, the 1889 swing-out cylinder design didn't come in .45. That caliber waited for the New Service.

Dime novel author Frederick Whittaker had already poked fun at the old Colt SAA in his 1882 book Parson Jim, King of the Cowboys. Jim outshoots a fellow using an "outmoded" SAA, by quick drawing a "thirty-eight self cocker." Maybe Wyatt read the pulps and wanted to be modern, not old fashioned, or a victim.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
51 Posts
Wyatt must have owned a lot of different guns over his lifetime. He went from flush to thin many times over the years. In Bob Boze Bell's "The Illustrated Life and Times of Wyatt Earp," there is a photo of Wyatt's "Baby Pony" nickle plated .45 with 7 1/2 inch barrel and ivory grips, SN 87145. Supposedly given by Josephine Marcus to Lincoln Ellsworth in 1937. It was made in 1883 so too late for OK Corral.
The Autry museum has some Earp and Tombstone guns as well.
See this "True West" magazine article. Pretty interesting.

 
41 - 60 of 79 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top