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What do you guys find to be the best gun oil that doesn’t fade the vintage colt blue on some of the old pythons and such over the years. Would like to hear from people that have owned since the 70s or 80s and have consistently used similar oils over the years.
 

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Most here wax their guns,oil and grease for moving parts internally and bores. All semi autos get engine oil as it is designed to cling and not migrate unlike thin gun oils that migrate and stain wood.
 

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I use High Mileage Mobil Synthetic Oil on my firearms since some of them have a lot of hard use and years on them. I like 10-40w but it doesn't seem to matter what weight of oil is used. I change the recoil filter every time and sometimes look at the cabin filter( who knew that was a thing?) when I get the full service treatment.
 

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I do NOT agree "most here wax", I use oil and always have. My family alone (and millions of others in America) have guns going back to the 1800s that have always had a thin coat of oil on them, and look fantastic. One of mine is from the pre-Civil War. The arms and armor in the Tower of London from King Henry the 8th, used oil over the centuries. Cosmoline for very harsh conditions was used by the US Military between WWI and into the 1980s.

I've used CLP Breakfree for the past 25 years. Once I put my guns in storage with just CLP on them, left the country for 6 years without even looking at them or touching them. When I got them out again, they are all perfect, preserved. Studies have shown (Google comparison tests) that CLP and 2 or 3 other oils out perform wax in harsh environments many times over. Wax is for museums where people use feather dusters every day, keeping their guns in humidity controlled glass cases. Oil is what the military, hunters, and collectors used on steel arms for 500 years, with perfect results.

Get some CLP.
 

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Just about any oil labeled as gun oil. In recent years I have used Lucas gun oil... the blue stuff that smells like the disinfectant used in better public rest rooms... It has worked great for years.

FWIW

Chuck
 

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I do NOT agree "most here wax", I use oil and always have. My family alone (and millions of others in America) have guns going back to the 1800s that have always had a thin coat of oil on them, and look fantastic. One of mine is from the pre-Civil War. The arms and armor in the Tower of London from King Henry the 8th, used oil over the centuries. Cosmoline for very harsh conditions was used by the US Military between WWI and into the 1980s.

I've used CLP Breakfree for the past 20 years. Once I put my guns in storage with just CLP on them, left the country for 6 years without even looking at them or touching them. When I got them out again, they are all perfect, preserved. Studies have show (Google them) that CLP and 2 or 3 other oils out perform wax in harsh environments many times over. Wax is for museums where people use feather dusters every day, keeping their guns in humidity controlled glass cases. Oil is what the military, hunters, and collectors used for 200 years, with perfect results.

Get some CLP.
CLP is owned by the same company that makes CO Collector. CLP works great for storage as you note but CO Collector is what they intend for long term storage. Irrespective, either product works better than wax.
 

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I have been using Break Free CLP for about 40 years. Not a speck of rust, ever and no fading of bluing. Of course I have been fortunate to live in areas that are usually very low humidity.
 

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I've also used CLP Breakfree since I was given a partial quart bottle back in the early 80's by a National Guard Captain. His unit was issued CLP to clean M60 Tank 105mm barrels and the .50 caliber machine guns.

The current CLP is a different chemical mix then the original but the Preservative and Cleaner components not only protect gun finishes, it also lifts any oxidized bluing and keeps the finish like new.

There are any number of products you can use to protect and preserve a gun but CLP is among the very best.
As my mom used to say "It's as good as the best and better then the rest".
 

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I have to confess that I have never waxed one of my guns either. Spanning many years of collecting I have yet to find a gun oil that didn't work, some just better than others. I use two now, one being M-Pro 7 which is excellent plus it has no odor. The other being AtomOil, which a good friends daughter developed, and is low odor. She is a chemist for a lubrication company that develops lubrication to meet a customer's needs, and at the urging of her dad developed the AtomOil for firearms.
 

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As a kid, I used "3-in-1" oil, and never had any rust. After CLP came out, I used it for years and never had any rust, but found that very long term it became gummy. I saw a Tetra-Gun test at a SHOT Show that convinced me it give superior protection to CLP, so I used it for years. Now that Eezox has been developed and tests available online have shown that it gives better protection against rust than other popular brands of oils, I now have switched to it.

Bottom line, any oil will give better protection than wax. (There is a Eezox versus wax test online, showing how poorly wax protects against moisture.) When there is accidental water exposure form a leaking pipe or roof, Eezox appears to provide the best protection available. Absent any water exposure, any oil will work better than wax to prevent rust.
 

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I'm glad this question was asked. Very informative.

To add to the discussion, now that we've established a product, how frequently are you guys oiling a daily carry vintage blue revolver, or any gun for that matter?
 

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As I mentioned in the above thread, CO Collector is the higher performance version of CLP. So, it only needs application infrequently. Some guns every time I use them, others once a year or so. Jack
 

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I was reading this post . And a lot of people recommend CLP. I've always used Hoppes #9. But I bought some CLP a while ago. It was on sale & I was almost out of a good cleaner that was also a good preservative oil. So I thought I would try it out. After reading this post. I decided to re-clean & oil my Colt trooper MKIII .357. I have been looking for something to restore the blueing & grips. CLP is amazing. The blueing looks beautiful & I didn't intend to get any on the original grips. But my gun rag has never been washed (it's covered in gun oil). The grips shined up nicely. Thanks Yawl!
 

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3 in 1 oil. For everything. For decades. I haven’t faded yet, neither have my Colts or S&W Guns. Tried waxing once! What a PIA.
 

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To add to the discussion, now that we've established a product, how frequently are you guys oiling a daily carry vintage blue revolver, or any gun for that matter?
[/QUOTE]

Carrying a pistol in a holster daily requires at least a fast wipe-down daily.
The holster will rub the oil off and it needs to be replaced to protect the metal.
When I carried blued guns I'd put a drop or two of lube on a cotton patch and when I took it off I'd give the areas where the lube was gone a fast wipe to apply just a very thin coat.
Since a holster doesn't make 100% contact with all surfaces only some areas have the lube rubbed off.
After a couple of days I'd pitch the oily patch and use a new one.

Occasionally I'd change to a wipe down with a silicone cloth to protect it. Because I was always paranoid-careful about my guns I never saw any difference between a lube wipe and a silicone wipe.

Cloth will accumulate dirt and grit that can damage a finish. This is also why I threw silicone cloths away as soon as they started getting a little dirty looking.
I always made my own silicone cloths by buying a yard of white cotton flannel at a fabric shop and cutting them into size. Then I'd liberally wet them down with spray silicone and after drying I'd store it in a plastic bag.
As soon as it got a little dirty looking I replaced it with a new one.

Fair warning: If you make your own silicone cloths, make sure you get standard auto type silicone, NOT the environmentally friendly type.
The EPA type contains waster in the propellant and that will cause a cloth to mildew horribly in a bag.

I remember many years ago a famous gun writer had been using 3 In 1 oil and found out that the old type had almost no rust preventing qualities. 3 In 1 apparently changed the formula later to correct this.
 
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