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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've gone thru a couple, the thumbs forward one I'm very uncomfortable with. Guy who works at the range lately, Army Vet, combat in Irag, showed me the "cup & saucer" grip; he uses it and I like it - he may have said he first learned it in the Army, not sure. I know awhile back Army used to teach it.. Dominant hand holds the gun very firmly, non-dominant hand is "cupping" the dominant one.

View attachment 23917
I know this grip is criticized for allowing too much recoil and therefore more time when trying shoot multiple rounds quickly, so I'll have to check that out more thoroughly. Haven't noticed it especially but I have just started using that grip lately. I know I do get very good accuracy using it though.

Anyway, do you use a particular known grip, if so what might it be - especially for "combat", Self-Defense-type shooting.

(By the way, case it matters, the gun I've been especially using the "cup & saucer" with is my Sig P220 Elite 45acp, full-size gun, 39 oz unloaded.)

Thanks
 

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Wrap your non firing hand around the front of your firing hand. Gently pull in on your non firing hand to brace against the recoil. That's how I was taught.
 

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Mine's close to yours and a little more like what MaximumBob suggests. I use it for revolvers as well. My left hand supports my right but is in front of my left hand with left thumb resting on the first knuckle of my shooting hand and my left fingers wrapped around the back of my right hand. Right arm is straight out, not bent and to me all feels 'natural'. When it feels that way and consistent, most folks shoot better.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Mine's close to yours and a little more like what MaximumBob suggests. I use it for revolvers as well. My left hand supports my right but is in front of my left hand with left thumb resting on the first knuckle of my shooting hand and my left fingers wrapped around the back of my right hand. Right arm is straight out, not bent and to me all feels 'natural'. When it feels that way and consistent, most folks shoot better.
In other words,your grip is like the traditional "cup and saucer" as in the photo, but the the supporting hand is up more but not as far up as what MaximumBob suggests? That right?
So you could still do the push/pull if you wished.

Sounds good. I'll try it. (Actually if you look carefully at the guy's fingers in that photo, the "cupped" hand is placed up to the second finger of the shooting hand. Maybe on a careful, second look, the guy in the photo is really doing what you already use.)

That's what I've always used with revolvers and I like that. I now have about the same grip with the Sig I carry and sometimes rotate with a Colt Detective or Colt Cobra 38, 'especially in summer with just a T-shirt on. (The Sig needs a vest or open shirt to conceal under). I think if you shoot in a rotation for Self-Defense, the more similar placement of the gun on your body, grip, action of the guns' that's alike the better it is. Both the revolvers and the Sig I wear at 3:30 with OWB, and the first shot of each is DA. And now I'll have the same hand-grip.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I use one Hand, Thumb 'relaxed'...
Interesting. A friend was in the Army in '50s said they were trained one-handed with their Colt 1911s, shooting with body to the side, shooting arm straight out towards target, non-dominant hand in back pocket. He said they would have thought you were nuts to shoot two-handed. How shooting styles change!

Do you shoot a 1911 or a full-size gun one-handed? Must be the quickest way to draw and fire.
 

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2 Thumbs Forward. The cup and saucer or "Hollywood" as I like to call it never worked for me or her while shooting Pistols. I'll use Hollywood for revolvers, if I have to use 2 hands, otherwise I prefer 1 hand.
 

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In other words,your grip is like the traditional "cup and saucer" as in the photo, but the the supporting hand is up more but not as far up as what MaximumBob suggests? That right?
So you could still do the push/pull if you wished.
That's pretty much correct. It's all a matter of what you're used to. :cool:
 
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