Colt Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
222 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some opinions or ideas.. If you were out in the deep back country and you say, dropped a Colt DA in the river you were fishing.. Maybe you slipped and fell in with it in a holster. What would you do to take care of the gun? In my case aerosol lube is out of the question.. But possibly a small bottle of oil.. Would you take along one of your special revolver screwdrivers with you to remove the side plate? Can you heat up an unloaded revolver enough to evaporate out water? I'm a little concerned.. It could be days before I would otherwise be able to disassemble and clean up and relube. What have you guys taken along with you to be prepared for stripping down or drying out a revolver in the field?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I carry a 4 oz bottle of Ballistol in my kit, along with sundry other items.

I'd wipe it dry, empty of course, spray or douse with Ballistol, and get on with it . .even if it does start to rust,
it will function for months that way, which will get me home, where I can deal with the results.

It's a tool - not an object of worship. Keep it functioning until you can get to the next one in your safe . . .
then send this one to the factory for regrooving!

Shadow Catcher
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
Unload, take the grips off, heat a pot of boiling water, let sit in water until metal is boiling water hot, take out and dry off as much as possible. The hot metal will take most of the water out of the gun. Lubricate with some type of oil. Get home fast!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
This brings to mind the funniest gun story I know. I was in a little gun shop in Alba, Texas 30 years ago, when a guy walks in with a paper sack in his hand. He and his Colt New Frontier .22 went swimming when he lost his boat in the river. He dissassemblied his gun and couldn't put it back together again. Gunsmith charged him $50 for about two minutes work and told me afterwards it was to keep his d... hands out of a gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
When I was younger I spent allot of time canoeing. It is very easy to tip a canoe over. My revolvers took a bath many times, and one night my 1911 was dropped over board. To my surprse, my wife dove and retrieved it in the morning. I sprayed it down with WD 40, put fresh ammo in it, and used it the rest of the weekend. The only issue I ever had was the ammo. Test firing as an experiment, I say 4 out of 10 wet bullets would misfire. I got into a habit of using nail polish on the primers of all my ammo when ever I went boating. That solved my problem with misfires. You can get by in the field for a few days untill you get home to clean and lubricate your handgun.

Heck 40 some years ago, me and my M16 stayed wet for weeks and it still fired when I pulled the trigger. Millitary ammo has sealed primers, imagine that. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: ProTourAero

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
WD 40 is an excellent water displacer. That's what W D stands for. Force the spray as best you can into the innards around the hammer and trigger openings and also on the outside, wipe down and worry about de-gunking the WD 40 when you get home.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,519 Posts
Just carry only your stainless steel Colts and a small pocket-size spray can of WD40 to dry out the carbon steel parts inside. Or switch to a true all-stainless gun made by a different maker.

Truthfully, just wiping off the gun and blowing out the inside the best you can with your own breath will be enough. The residual oil on the inside parts will prevent any serious rust. Bluing is a controlled form of rust and wiping off the outside will be enough.

Of course, if the gun has been properly treated with Ezzox, almost nothing will be needed. Just check out the tests on that remarkable product's ability to prevent rust for long periods of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I had to jump in a river and grab a dog that got hung up on some brush. We were Duck hunting and checking our traps at the same time. I had a Peacemaker .22 on my belt. I emptied the pistol and blew out, wiped off as much water as I could. It survived just fine. Before the advent of ceramic and teflon coatings for firearms, I used to use furniture wax on the inaccessible parts of my hunting rifles. If you are headed out to the back country coat the internals with wax, and carry a small can of WD.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,119 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,803 Posts
I have had this happen to me. I wasn't carrying a revolver, but a 1911. I was fishing & got swept off my feet in the river. My gun got thoroughly wet. When I got on the bank I emptied it, dryed it as well as I could, cycled it a few times, then reloaded & walked back to my truck where I further dried it. It would have worked fine. I thoughly cleaned & lubed it when I got home.

Another time I was up hunting on horses, I was carrying my rifle in a saddle scabbard & my horse's sweat soaked the muzzle end of the scabbard & muzzle or my rifle. I didn't discover this till I was back in camp that night. I carry a cleaning kit in my P/U so was able to run a brush & patch down the bore. My bottle of cleaning solvent had dried out. I thought for a minute about lubing the bore as protection, & remembered my P/U had 6 quarts of oil in the engine. I got some oil off the dipstick & oiled the bore of my rifle.

We can remember if we have a vehicle, we have enough easily obtained oil to lub it.:D
Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
Lots of good ideas here guys but he stated aerosols are out of the question. I agree with those who say wipe it down and do a good job on it once you get home. I have had guns drenched from rains and frankly other than an exterior wipe down never had a problem....at least for a few days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,935 Posts
I think I manage to fall down more fly fishing than most people for some reason (not drinking!)....since I almost always carry a gun in the woods, I switched to stainless for that duty long ago.....one of my favorites is a .357 mag 2.5" Custom Cobra, and she's been underwater in Connecticut, Louisiana and Alaska....and a few spots in between.....still looks pretty new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,332 Posts
WD 40 is an excellent water displacer. That's what W D stands for. Force the spray as best you can into the innards around the hammer and trigger openings and also on the outside, wipe down and worry about de-gunking the WD 40 when you get home.
2nd diamon's opinion!

Liquid WD in a small squeeze bottle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
PonyLover has a good idea. In the Army for inspection, we would take the wood off the our Garrands and put them in a really, steaming hot shower. Then, take it out. It dried itself. No oil until after inspection.

Of course, if I was going near water with a handgun, I would put it in a water proof plastic bag, just like I did my camera equipment. No harm, no foul.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
222 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all for the suggestions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
In a really severe situation where sand, mud or salt water are part of the situation I would unload the gun, remove the grips and flush the weapon with fresh water and then submerge it in kerosene or diesel fuel. If you can, work the action when the gun is submerged the kerosene will flush out the water and give you some time to do a good cleaning later.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top