Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that there are different agencies that define what class a certain firearm falls into. But I'm from old school US Army. From my days, a machine gun was a full automatic weapon, usually crew served and fired from a mount, that was self feeding. Feed was from a belt or feed strip. Weapons that were fed by magazine (which contained the follower and follower spring) were designated as automatic rifles or the archaic term machine rifle.

This prompted by the post of firing 43 different "machine guns."

Bob Wright
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Technically, I believe "machine gun" covers all fully automatic guns shooting a full power rifle cartridge, and I believe they should also be capable of sustained fire. It's an old and somewhat generic term though, and to me it gets blurrier with every new gun type that's introduced. It's easier if you're a politician, then it's a machine gun if it resembles a military firearm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,823 Posts
Gotta agree...there are various definitions thrown around. To me, a machine gun is a weapon that fires more than one full-power rifle round when the trigger is squeezed and held. A submachine gun definition is pretty much defined the same with the differences of being hand-held and firing a pistol round. A machine gun may or may not be hand held.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Matchlock and ei8ht

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
594 Posts
From my days, a machine gun was a full automatic weapon, usually crew served and fired from a mount, that was self feeding. Feed was from a belt or feed strip. Weapons that were fed by magazine (which contained the follower and follower spring) were designated as automatic rifles or the archaic term machine rifle.
That is exactly how I define them as well. An M2 .50BMG is a machine gun, an M16 is an automatic rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,850 Posts
I know that there are different agencies that define what class a certain firearm falls into. But I'm from old school US Army. From my days, a machine gun was a full automatic weapon, usually crew served and fired from a mount, that was self feeding. Feed was from a belt or feed strip. Weapons that were fed by magazine (which contained the follower and follower spring) were designated as automatic rifles or the archaic term machine rifle.
.





Correct.

SMG's , assault rifles, main battle rifles with a 3d selector position are not MG's.

Semiautomatic rifles with box magazine are not assault rifles.They are semiauto rifles.

"Silencers" are not silencers, they are suppressors/mufflers.

"Assault weapons" do not exist, this is a political term.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
At the gun club a machinegun is the one that leaves the biggest smile on your face when you shoot it.:D


"In United States gun law, "machine gun" is a legal term for any weapon able to fire more than one shot per trigger pull regardless of caliber, the receiver of any such weapon, any weapon convertible to such a state using normal tools, or any component or part that will modify an existing firearm such that it functions as a "machine gun" such as a drop-in auto sear.[1] Civilian possession of such weapons is not prohibited by any Federal law and not illegal in many states, but they must be registered as Title II weapons under the National Firearms Act and have a tax stamp paid. The Hughes Amendment to the Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986 banned new production of firearms classified as machine guns for most civilian applications, however, so only "grandfathered" weapons produced before this date are legally transferable."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
At the gun club a machinegun is the one that leaves the biggest smile on your face when you shoot it.:D


"In United States gun law, "machine gun" is a legal term for any weapon able to fire more than one shot per trigger pull regardless of caliber, the receiver of any such weapon, any weapon convertible to such a state using normal tools, or any component or part that will modify an existing firearm such that it functions as a "machine gun" such as a drop-in auto sear.[1] Civilian possession of such weapons is not prohibited by any Federal law and not illegal in many states, but they must be registered as Title II weapons under the National Firearms Act and have a tax stamp paid. The Hughes Amendment to the Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986 banned new production of firearms classified as machine guns for most civilian applications, however, so only "grandfathered" weapons produced before this date are legally transferable."
I agree its a "legal term" but certainly not a technical one.

Bob Wright
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
I was just giving the government standards for what is a machinegun when it comes to the laws. Technically I believe each machine has its own operation that puts it in one class or the other. A BAR is an automatic rifle as classed by the military but is a machinegun to the government. A full auto 40 milimeter grenade launcher isn't a machinegun but operates the same. Yet a minigun with an electric motor and 3,000 rounds a minute is called a machinegun even though it operates different.

I really can't explain how so many guns are covered under the same heading but they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
They are machine pistols but under the laws they would be machineguns if they fire more than one shot with a single pull of the trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,823 Posts
If the politicians got involved with mathematics they'd probably pass a law making 2+2=5. They use the same thought processes when it come to firearms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,850 Posts
I was just giving the government standards for what is a machinegun when it comes to the laws. Technically I believe each machine has its own operation that puts it in one class or the other. A BAR is an automatic rifle as classed by the military but is a machinegun to the government. A full auto 40 milimeter grenade launcher isn't a machinegun but operates the same. Yet a minigun with an electric motor and 3,000 rounds a minute is called a machinegun even though it operates different.

I really can't explain how so many guns are covered under the same heading but they are.

Because they're wrong. And have an agenda.

If a law says 2+2=17, does not make it so.

BobWright was referring to the true definition of MG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
Site won't let me type under reply and it has other problems but I have no agenda other than to say how much I have enjoyed FA for many years. There is a number of makes and models but they all fall under how many shots will they fire with one pull of the trigger.

Jim
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top