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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The '43 OM .22 I recently picked up has 4 small rust spots on the left side of the barrel, I knew about it beforehand and wanted it as a shooter. What do you recommend to stop any further deterioration? It's not a showpiece by any means, but it's a fine shooter. Each spot is about 1/16" in size with 2 close together over the lettering on the barrel.
thanks...
 

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To "kill" the rust and prevent further action, get a can of Kroil or any good penetrating fluid.

Liberally coat the areas, and allow to soak for a day or two.
The Kroil or fluid will penetrate the crusty rust and soften it.

After soaking, make up a scraper from sheet brass, or by smashing the mouth of a brass rifle case and filing it to an edge.

Apply more fluid, then scrap the rusty spots with the scraper.
After scraping, give the area more fluid and brush with a brass "toothbrush".

Wipe all the dirt and fluid off, then coat with a thin coat of CLP Breakfree.

The Breakfree will prevent further rust, and will continue to "work" at any remaining rust.

Unlike using steel wool, this method won't further degrade the bluing.
 

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Good information above. I just "swap" the brass case and use an "old copper penny". They are aboundant, handy, usually around someplace and flat you can 'hold onto', scrape the the spot with the edge of the coin.
Don't ask "why" but it has always worked for ME, an oldtimer said the copper in the 'pit' stops the continuation of the rust.
I think mainly it's the "softer" non-metallic metal just cleaning off the "loose" rust and the oil is what stops it!! /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, great info..
Now, the next obvious question, at least to me, if I get it cleaned up completely, can I put a spot of cold blue on the spots to help protect it and hide it a bit?
 

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From my experience of the years with rust spots, cold blue seems to do more harm than good.

Cold blues tend to cause a discoloration "splotch" in the original bluing around the rust spot, and this makes the spot MORE noticeable.

Also, cold blue tends to itself rust if not properly used.

If you decide to give it a try, use a Q-tip and try to limit the cold bluing to as small an area as possible.
 

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dfariswheel speaks the truth! I can verify from sad personal experiance. If you try it, use it on the smallest area you possibly can(Q tips), and try to avoid smearing it into areas where coloring isn't needed. It will in fact discolor the good blueing.
 
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