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Anyone out there familiar with the JP Sauer & Sohn Western Marshal? It is an SAA copy. Is a good used one in cal. 45 Colt worth $450 to $500? Is it an exact SAA copy, or does it have a transfer bar and other modern revisions?
 

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Pretty good quality. Not an exact copy of the Colt SAA. I think they had frame mounted firing pins. A nice condition used one should be worth $450.
 

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It's a copy of the Colt SAA made by J.P. Sauer & Sons of Germany. It was the first handgun I ever owned. It was a .44 MAG way back in 1966.
 

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The JP Sauer Western Marshal isn't identical to the SAA. They sold the rights to Weirauch who makes them and sells them through EAA as the Bounty Hunter and the latest version does have a safety transfer bar. Not sure about the earlier version, but I think $450-500 is a bit high re: market value. They are good tough guns, but CAS shooters rarely use them because they can't be tuned like a SAA or vaquero (or not as easily).
 

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The frame and cylinder are also noticeably larger than a real SAA. Depending on condition I would go no higher than $300-325 for an excellent specimen. They are good for shooters but far from collectible.
 

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Had one many years ago that was well built and quite accurate. I put several thousand rounds through it with no problem and it still looked good when I sold it for the princely sum of $175.00. I would guess current value to be 300-350 in excellent condition.
 

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I have a Hy Hunter, which is for all practical purposes the same gun. Around here the asking price is $400~$500, often go for about $350~$375.

Parts are readily available, and the grip straps from Ubertis will fit. Further, if not of the transfer bar variety, I understand a Colt firing pin bushing and hammer can be fitted. I'm looking into doing that now.

Here is before, as bought:



And after a little work:



Bob Wright
 

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Just in general JP Sauer and Sohn were high quality manufacturers out of Suhl, Germany that made many highly regarded weapons and were known for solid craftsmanship. Through wars and ownership iterations, they were the grandfather of the Sauer in Sig Sauer.

For a bit of background on the manufacturer see here;

Historic Firearm of the Month, October 2000

Doesn't help with your particular example though and I have no experience with their single actions.
 

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It's a copy of the Colt SAA made by J.P. Sauer & Sons of Germany. It was the first handgun I ever owned. It was a .44 MAG way back in 1966.
Bingo! 1st .44 magnum I owned was also a JP Sauer & Son (think maybe it read Sohn?) back about the same time. It was a nice solid built SA. I traded it even for a 2" S&W model 10 RB a couple of years after getting that .44.
 

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Marshall Dillon carried a Hawes Western Marshall in "Gunsmoke". I wonder if it was a Sauer...or maybe just a Hawes.

I AM PRETTY SURE Matt Dillon's pistol in "Gunsmoke" was an American made GREAT WESTERN. The show predates the SIG/SAUER SA sixguns by a decade or two.
 

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I AM PRETTY SURE Matt Dillon's pistol in "Gunsmoke" was an American made GREAT WESTERN. The show predates the SIG/SAUER SA sixguns by a decade or two.
Indeed he did. Not only Matt Dillon, but J.B. Books, a.k.a. John Wayne, had a pair in The Shootist, a gift from Bill Wilson early in the days of Great Westerns. These are in the Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City.

Bob Wright
 

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For anyone interested in the old GW's a new book was released about a yr ago about them,they're $ 30.00 & are available from the author @ [email protected] About 2 yrs ago I re-built 1 of the 2 GW's that Clint Walker carried in his series Cheyenne,I have 5 of them in my collection,one is a brand new in the box unfired 4 3/4 .44spcl.
 

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For whatever its worth, here is some data I have gleaned from various sources regarding these Colt SAA copies.

Great Western Arms was founded around 1950, manufactured in Hollywood, Calif. Bill Wilson was the principal officer, Audie Murphy a prominent investor. The Single Action they manufactured was a copy of the Colt SAA except for the firing pin, which was of the Christy type designed by Christy Gun Works of San Francisco.

Haywood "Hy" Hunter became a principal distributor for GW arms. He published an elaborate catalog of GW guns and Colt revolvers also around 1955. As GW encountered financial problems, Hy Hunter took the GW to J.P Sauer & Sohn of Suhl, Germany around 1958. These copies of the Great Western were sold as the Hy Hunter Western Six Shooter model in various calibers. Around 1965 Hy Hunter left the gun business, and these guns were imported by Hawes.

Hawes went defunct in 1980 as a result of law suits, and J.P. Sauer sold the tooling to Weirauch or Germany

Hawes guns were sold under the models of Western Marshal, Texas Marshal, Montana Marshal, and Silver City Marshal. These varied as to caliber and grip straps, either brass, alloy, or steel. Grip panels were either walnut or plastic imitation stag.

These German made guns were all well made, and so far as I know, were either all blue or nickel finished.

Early reviews of the Great Western guns indicated that many parts were interchangable with the Colt SAA, and even (for $8.00 extra) a Colt firing pin bushing and Colt hammer could be installed on the GW after removal of the Christy firing pin assembly.

The above gleaned from notes I've made over the years.

Bob Wright
 

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For whatever its worth, here is some data I have gleaned from various sources regarding these Colt SAA copies.

Great Western Arms was founded around 1950, manufactured in Hollywood, Calif. Bill Wilson was the principal officer, Audie Murphy a prominent investor. The Single Action they manufactured was a copy of the Colt SAA except for the firing pin, which was of the Christy type designed by Christy Gun Works of San Francisco.

Haywood "Hy" Hunter became a principal distributor for GW arms. He published an elaborate catalog of GW guns and Colt revolvers also around 1955. As GW encountered financial problems, Hy Hunter took the GW to J.P Sauer & Sohn of Suhl, Germany around 1958. These copies of the Great Western were sold as the Hy Hunter Western Six Shooter model in various calibers. Around 1965 Hy Hunter left the gun business, and these guns were imported by Hawes.

Hawes went defunct in 1980 as a result of law suits, and J.P. Sauer sold the tooling to Weirauch or Germany

Hawes guns were sold under the models of Western Marshal, Texas Marshal, Montana Marshal, and Silver City Marshal. These varied as to caliber and grip straps, either brass, alloy, or steel. Grip panels were either walnut or plastic imitation stag.

These German made guns were all well made, and so far as I know, were either all blue or nickel finished.

Early reviews of the Great Western guns indicated that many parts were interchangable with the Colt SAA, and even (for $8.00 extra) a Colt firing pin bushing and Colt hammer could be installed on the GW after removal of the Christy firing pin assembly.

The above gleaned from notes I've made over the years.

Bob Wright
Bob:You've been given some wrong info,GW was founded in 1954 & remained in business until 1962,Hy Hunter was never an owner he was just a distributor.They weren't manufactured in Hollywood but in West L.A. Ca.on Miner st. who ever wrote the article your quoting didn't know what they were talking about.If you'll buy the book you'll see what the real story is & as a side note what I'm posting is 1st hand info based on the fact that I was there & used to build many of the old GW's.
 

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Well, I sure didn't mean to be putting out bogus information. I did say Hy Hunter was a distributor, not an owner. And the dates I quoted contained a lot of "arounds." Again, this was not from any one source but rather from numerous posts and notes from magazines and/or books, none of which I bought myself.

Please accept my apologies.

Bob Wright
 

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Bob:I wasn't being critical of you no apologies necessary,there have been many articles written by so called "experts" & as you know once it's printed someplace it becomes fact & then is quoted as such,if you'd like to see more on the old GW's you can go on greatwesternfirearms.com lots of em on there.
 
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