Colt Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been collecting/buying Colts and other pistols for about 25 years now. I have never seen a run on the market like what has gone on the past 4 - 5 months. You know its bad when even Glock's are getting scarce. Does anyone else recall a time when the firearms market was this hot? What was the cause? It doesn't seem like the Manufacturers can keep up with supply. It might be on purpose, if they ramp up, what happens on the back end when the market goes soft. Even though they are already sold to distributors, the companies have to be happy that most of the clunkers have flown off the shelves. Do they look at this as an opportunity to evaluate their long term sales opportunities and refine what they will put out in the future?
Sorry about the rambling but I was just wondering how Colt and the rest of the Firearms industry might handle this situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
Sure it's happened before; the first time I remember was the Gun Control Act of 1968. Then the world's greatest gun salespeople, Bill and Hillary with the "assault on weapons" ban of 1994, everytime there's a mass shooting or large-scale civil unrest, and when President Obama was elelcted. Anytime you tell people they can't have something it's going to be in demand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
If there is a R returning next year, sales will go down. If a D comes in, it will go through the roof short term until the Gun Czar is appointed named Robert (Beto) Orouke and he will come for your guns.I do not understand how toilet paper and bullets are in short supply during a pandemic? And no one helped to sell more guns and ammo than President Obama in his eight years.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
From what I remember, for Obama, it seemed like the main run was on the bad black rifles but definitely a run on ammo.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MarkInTx

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,979 Posts
As cities burned in the 60s, I am certain that sales ramped up. However, this spate of well-financed insurgency is shooting itself in the foot. It is unsustainable and signs of common sense making a re-appearance are noted here and there. A curious change is that nearly all of the large gun makers whose sales surged back then are either gone, exist in name only or are limping along through various financial woes. The NewGen guns are all the rage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: marrunred

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
The BIG demand, on guns and ammo, was right after 9/11. I had my license then, and I remember selling everything I had, including ammo, except 4-5 guns, in one weekend. people were buying 9mm,45acp and 223 by the multiple cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,603 Posts
I would think most of the gunmakers should have learned the lessons of '16...don't go over-capacity then have the rug get pulled out from under and then have lots of product on the shelves and in the pipeline with no one to sell them to. If the Dems get in...then sales will stay strong...if the GOP gets in...then they can easily scale back if necessary without being overstock.

The joker in the deck right now is the civil disturbances being experienced...they may keep going and drive the market or they might slack off...could be related to the upcoming elections or not. It's difficult to predict what crazy people and committed insurrectionists will do.

If the disturbances die down then I think we'll be seeing a lot of barely or unused shotguns and AR-type rifles on the racks of gun stores when those who were scared don't feel they need them anymore and want to let them go. They'll probably be bent out of shape when they find out how little they will receive for them once the market settles down. They will get a lesson in the free market economics of a sellers market vs a buyer's market.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,183 Posts
Panic buying is nothing new. This is a different than the ones I’ve saw before. I can’t speak to numbers of each buying frenzy. With this one, the people are starting “to wake up”, and I’m glad. One of best things that’s happening for the security on this nation and the 2nd amendment. I’ve saw some cultures (anti-gun taught) known for following dictators, starting to buy guns and think for them selves. An independent thinking nation is a well armed nation 🧠🐍. And soon they will start sending eviction notices to ones that impede on their freedoms and rights 🇺🇸🥳.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,459 Posts
The business trend has been for all manufacturing, sales, or services to consolidate to fewer and fewer companies. Think Boeing and Lockheed for aerospace, where during the Cold War there were dozens of companies like McDonnell Douglas, Convair, etc. Has happened with bookstores (amazon), department stores (walmart), software (microsoft) et al.

The gun trend is there are very few hunters or target shooters anymore. It's all defense. In 1960 probably 80% of American men hunted or fished occasionally. Those were the guns you saw in the back windows or pickups and on the covers of sporting magazines. Men holding up a couple ducks, or a couple trophies. It was quaint and not threatening. Today, it's probably 5% of those under 40. The guns you see today are tactical weapons for the most part.

Put together, there will only be 2-3 companies worldwide making mostly black guns for defense.

There will always be a few boutique craftsman gun companies like Shiloh and Standard to make the few historic designs. The middle ground companies will fold, or struggle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,603 Posts
I don't think there are that many companies who have the technology or capacity to do the forgings and quality castings needed for guns like the AR-platform. Most of the companies that sell AR-type rifles probably buy the raw forgings from a limited number of forging operators...each to differing levels of quality control to meet a specific price point. Some could even buy blemished products others won't. They put their names on the receivers, assemble and finish them and send them out to distributors and retailers. When the market tanks they go out of business having made their profits as long as they could and are no longer in the game.
 
  • Like
Reactions: marrunred

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
I don't think there are that many companies who have the technology or capacity to do the forgings and quality castings needed for guns like the AR-platform. Most of the companies that sell AR-type rifles probably buy the raw forgings from a limited number of forging operators...each to differing levels of quality control to meet a specific price point. Some could even buy blemished products others won't. They put their names on the receivers, assemble and finish them and send them out to distributors and retailers. When the market tanks they go out of business having made their profits as long as they could and are no longer in the game.
Oh yes there are so many it would make your head hurt. Not difficult by any means. Price out a bare lower it will be all too clear. Additionally, many of them are not even in this country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,603 Posts
Oh yes there are so many it would make your head hurt. Not difficult by any means. Price out a bare lower it will be all too clear. Additionally, many of them are not even in this country.
Maybe so...but what's the quality control like? Few, if any other than maybe FN invest in the quality control testing Colt does due to meeting government contracts. That costs...and for the most part you get what you pay for.

When it comes to the AR market...Colt is the Gold Standard and for a reason. I'm not saying there aren't others of quality...just that you don't know what standards they meet because they don't test for it maybe beyond a visual look over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,212 Posts
I've been collecting/buying Colts and other pistols for about 25 years now. I have never seen a run on the market like what has gone on the past 4 - 5 months. You know its bad when even Glock's are getting scarce. Does anyone else recall a time when the firearms market was this hot? What was the cause? It doesn't seem like the Manufacturers can keep up with supply. It might be on purpose, if they ramp up, what happens on the back end when the market goes soft. Even though they are already sold to distributors, the companies have to be happy that most of the clunkers have flown off the shelves. Do they look at this as an opportunity to evaluate their long term sales opportunities and refine what they will put out in the future?
Sorry about the rambling but I was just wondering how Colt and the rest of the Firearms industry might handle this situation.
Does anyone else recall a time when the firearms market was this hot?

Yes, right before and at the beginning of the Civil War! Sam Colt even helped to sneak 1100 to Texas, via Ben McCullough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
Maybe so...but what's the quality control like? Few, if any other than maybe FN invest in the quality control testing Colt does due to meeting government contracts. That costs...and for the most part you get what you pay for.

When it comes to the AR market...Colt is the Gold Standard and for a reason. I'm not saying there aren't others of quality...just that you don't know what standards they meet because they don't test for it maybe beyond a visual look over.
It’s either Mil-Spec or it’s not. If it is than at random it would have to meet pretty stringent requirements. And as far as Colt goes, not that I’m gonna ‘bash’ them on a Colt forum but I’ll politely disagree with the gold standard comment. They used to be but I don’t think they are any more. Others have surpassed them in the AR dept.

On the op there has never been more guns sold than there has been in 2020. Since March each month consecutively has broken prior months numbers for NICs checks. Almost 5 million NICs check were done in June alone. That is the single largest number ever done since the GCA act of 68. And that doesn’t even count states where private sales transpired.
ammo has come and gone several times. But yeah I’ve never seen it where even handguns and I mean EVERY one is in short supply. I’ve seen runs on evil black guns and high capacity mags, but never a shortage of Glocks?
it’ll be a while before it recovers if it ever does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,839 Posts
I think Trump will lose in Nov- in 2021 the Democrats will then go after the 2nd hard and with glee.

You don't have to guess about it- just read the DNC's platform on the issue.

People see the violence and chaos in the big cities and the police being defunded and held back from enforcing the law, they want to be able to defend themselves and their families. The run on firearms will continue at least until after the election.

Hope I am wrong about Trump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
According to the FBI, there were 3.6 million background checks performed in July. This was the 3rd highest recorded since they started keeping such stats in 1998. June at 3.91 million was the highest and this past March came in at the 2nd all-time highest at 3.74. Over 2.2 million purchasers this year have been reported as first-time buyers.

There are multiple causes--starting with the pandemic, followed by the various protests that have devolved into seemingly endless riots along with the wanton destruction of both public and private property. Add to that the constant progressive narrative to defund the police in big cities accompanied by marked jumps in the crime rates for those very same cities--you now have more and more normal law-abiding citizens who feel that they may not be able to depend on anyone other than themselves to defend their lives and property.

Of course, if Trump gets re-elected this will go away and guns will probably become cheap again as it was for the first couple of years after 2016. Actually that was sort of bad for a lot of gun companies due to the downturn in sales.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Maybe so...but what's the quality control like? Few, if any other than maybe FN invest in the quality control testing Colt does due to meeting government contracts. That costs...and for the most part you get what you pay for.

When it comes to the AR market...Colt is the Gold Standard and for a reason. I'm not saying there aren't others of quality...just that you don't know what standards they meet because they don't test for it maybe beyond a visual look over.
[/QUOTE
It’s either Mil-Spec or it’s not. If it is than at random it would have to meet pretty stringent requirements. And as far as Colt goes, not that I’m gonna ‘bash’ them on a Colt forum but I’ll politely disagree with the gold standard comment. They used to be but I don’t think they are any more. Others have surpassed them in the AR dept.

On the op there has never been more guns sold than there has been in 2020. Since March each month consecutively has broken prior months numbers for NICs checks. Almost 5 million NICs check were done in June alone. That is the single largest number ever done since the GCA act of 68. And that doesn’t even count states where private sales transpired.
ammo has come and gone several times. But yeah I’ve never seen it where even handguns and I mean EVERY one is in short supply. I’ve seen runs on evil black guns and high capacity mags, but never a shortage of Glocks?
it’ll be a while before it recovers if it ever does.
Well I need to give you a little information here so you do not make confusing statements regarding Mil Spec anything for that matter.

In order to be mil spec whatever the appropriate specification is it Must Be Inspected by a USG Inspector. This can ONLY be done for items being purchased under a Prime Contract. In order for the delegation to be provided to the GSI representative it must contain the Prime Contract number that in addition calls out the requirement for GSI to be performed. This means that the materials and processes used during manufacturer are in fact compliant to all of the requirements called out in the Prime Contract.

In the case of Colt it is easier for Common Parts that are to be used on all rifles USG, FMS or Commercial which is a fraction of their production to be sourced from the same manufacturer. The difference is there is no requirement to have the USG GSI approve the final product or in some cases in process approvals depending on the product. Just couple of examples are to provide the mill certifications and associated certifications of the heat treat process used for lower receivers o certifications for the std for anodize process which btw is more robust than the commercial type used on every firearm made in the commercial market. On my builds that have aluminum frames they are actually sent to a mil spec house that applies the MIL-A-8625, Type III it even looks different than the thinner commercial types and is more expensive. It is not inspected by the USG however it is done by a processor that has a certified process to perform the process approved by the USG or military contractors and is applied with that process.

Have spent too many hours with GSI and even getting delegation from the DCMA who actually delegates GSI which was not done and required prior to the DD 250's (acceptance document) were being executed to count. If you want to read about this process it is in 48 CFR part 552.246-71 Source Inspection by Government.

Lot of information here and not for everyone but if you want to know how it works than this is it. Will also let you know what you are Actually purchasing. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I think it's all about covid and BLM. Gotta protect my stuff.
 
  • Like
Reactions: marrunred
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top