Colt Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
From the early times many Colts have evolved, least of which are the BIG BOOMERS like the Paterson or the Colt Walker.I day dream about them at times wondering about how they were used and by whom.Would like to spend a week with them,how about you?

------------------
Keep your powder dry,but not hot.
Guns are for Gunners
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
I have for a couple years been fascinated by a SAA I saw. An old geezer down in Arcadia had a gunshop and the front of his shop looked just like an old western saloon or store, complete with swinging doors and a hitchin rail out front.
After reading an article in the newspaper about his place about 4 years back, I checked it out. He had a lot of nice old items and guns, but featured was a display case in the middle of the floor with 12 SAA's of various types, all with a number tag 1 thru 12 and little story with each. He wanted to sell all twelve for $18,000 and didn't want to break them up. Of course I didn't have that kind of money at the time, even though they were clearly worth every penny. One gun, as I recall would have fetched at least $4,500. Some Artillary models and I remember one with original ivory grips, but the one gun I can't get out of my mind was a 7 1/2" that was completly pitted on the outside, almost 95% and the inside and bore were pristine, like new. Story he had was the gun was used in a killing in 1905 and then hidden in a sofa or chair for years and had, god knows, every thing from beer to milk to urine spilled on it over the years and destroyed the exterior until it was found and supposedly traced to the old murder. Don't know if it was true or not, but it always made me wonder, what if the gun could talk. I guess the story that it was tied to a murder made it more intriging.
I went back about a year later and the gunshop was gone. Don't know what happened to the old geezer either. Oh well!, it's the kind of story you can tell your grandkids around the campfire anyway.

------------------
Dick

IN GOD WE TRUST,
BUT KEEP YOUR
SIDEARM HANDY!

[This message has been edited by diamonback68 (edited 01-12-2004).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
Now, Modoc - you're a poet! Growing up in our house, we always had my grand-dad's .44 Remington around. Especially to a kid, it was enormous, heavy and just terrifying. I guess in a way it spoiled the westerns, a little, for me, because with this German analytical mind, you know, I couldn't equate the stunts in the movies with this cannon. Now, my dad's Official Police, hanging over the back of his kitchen chair while he ate a huge bowl of Wheaties before going out on night shift - THAT perked my interest! Especially if it was one of those east-coast, pre-airconditioning summer, rainy nights. I remember Halloween never held any particular scariness for me and my brother. Spooks? Witches? Ghosts? Bah! Not on Pop's shift! That gun sits here in my den, in an oak case with green velvet. My sons and I still shoot it, too. Not exactly wild west, but seeing that gun and holster so often, smelling it when it was wet or covered with snow ... Something to the effect of, "No Crime Allowed, by order of Colt .38"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Now, Modoc - you're a poet! Growing up in our house, we always had my grand-dad's .44 Remington around. Especially to a kid, it was enormous, heavy and just terrifying. I guess in a way it spoiled the westerns, a little, for me, because with this German analytical mind, you know, I couldn't equate the stunts in the movies with this cannon. Now, my dad's Official Police, hanging over the back of his kitchen chair while he ate a huge bowl of Wheaties before going out on night shift - THAT perked my interest! Especially if it was one of those east-coast, pre-airconditioning summer, rainy nights. I remember Halloween never held any particular scariness for me and my brother. Spooks? Witches? Ghosts? Bah! Not on Pop's shift! That gun sits here in my den, in an oak case with green velvet. My sons and I still shoot it, too. Not exactly wild west, but seeing that gun and holster so often, smelling it when it was wet or covered with snow ... Something to the effect of, "No Crime Allowed, by order of Colt .38"
Beautiful picture. I'm drawn to the old police guns too-particularly the older Detective Specials, Police Positive's, Official Police and .357. My Dad was Prosecuting attorney of our rural Missouri county in the early to mid 1950's and as such he worked very closely with local law enforcement. The county sheriff, night marshall and Highway Patrol were frequent visitors to our house. Some of earliest memories are of those great, decent men..like your Dad... in uniforum with Sam Browne belts and invariably Colt revolvers. They were my first heroes. One of the first TV shows I remember is Dragnet, followed shortly by Highway Patrol....Broderick Crawford and Jack Webb made an impression with their trusty Detective Specials enforcing simple justice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,456 Posts
I always loved the single action army model and as soon as I could possibily get my parents to approve of it I put a scout 22 on layaway and got it several months later.

Years later I moved on to prewar single actions and that's been 30 years ago......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
I know what you mean. I'm "into" pre-war Colt and the older the better. Last week I traded for a Lightening and just agreed to a trade on a Thunderer. I MAY have an 1878 Frontier coming. I have several WWI & WWII issue rifles and a Colt 1917, a S & W 1917 and a British Victory. A 1902 Winchester 1897 marked Adams Express Co.

A few months ago, I walked into our LGS and the duty manager called me over to see a new gun in the inventory: a 1943 vet bring back, bought from the estate of a local veteran who received a battlefield commission on Iwo Jima. Suspicious pitting 3" back from the muzzle, on the top and sides of the slide and frame. Thanks to the wife, it ended up under the Christmas tree.

A good fire on a winter's night, a glass of Grand Marnier to sip, and you really get to wondering. So far, the ghosts have all been friendly. Maybe because we share our appreciation for these oldtimers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I know what you mean. I'm "into" pre-war Colt and the older the better. Last week I traded for a Lightening and just agreed to a trade on a Thunderer. I MAY have an 1878 Frontier coming. I have several WWI & WWII issue rifles and a Colt 1917, a S & W 1917 and a British Victory. A 1902 Winchester 1897 marked Adams Express Co.

A few months ago, I walked into our LGS and the duty manager called me over to see a new gun in the inventory: a 1943 vet bring back, bought from the estate of a local veteran who received a battlefield commission on Iwo Jima. Suspicious pitting 3" back from the muzzle, on the top and sides of the slide and frame. Thanks to the wife, it ended up under the Christmas tree.

A good fire on a winter's night, a glass of Grand Marnier to sip, and you really get to wondering. So far, the ghosts have all been friendly. Maybe because we share our appreciation for these oldtimers.
Can get have some pics of that bring back? I love the old rifles I have a 1942 BSA dispersal Enfield in its original stock in my safe. OT I love the early specials as well and am currently lusting after a Python.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Decisions, decisions---My (2) favorite keepers are a 1916 SAA 4 3/4" 45 Colt and a 1917 GI issue 1911.

The SAA came into our family when I was a kid, my dad traded a .22 cal. OMT (as best as I can remember) for it. Seems the original owner had only fired it to put down a crippled horse. My brother and I fired it some, but probably abused it more than we should have (Roy Rogers and Gene Autry wannabes).


The 1911 was a gift from above, so to speak. Walked into my LGS in 1990, still living in S. FL, and saw this piece soaking in solvent. The owner was trying to remove the grease from it (I suspect Cosmoline) so he could sell it. A customer was there who wanted to buy it and take it to the range for a tryout, but said he would return with the cash. Needless to say, it was sold before he returned. This old beauty is about as new (and unused) as I have ever seen, even in books. I should letter it from Colt, to see where it was sent. Can't imagine how it survived unsued, but that's the fun part of this exercise. One can only wonder!

Thanks modoc, this is a great thread for the Forum---alot of neat stuff to contemplate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,915 Posts
The New Service fires my interest and imagination most of all though I do like a lot of other Colt models a lot.

I have a Model 1909 and a Model 1917 and they both see fairly regular use. The Model 1917 occasionally is holstered for hikes about the old family place.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top