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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello fellow shooters! I was thinking on my way to the range about single action shooting and double action shooting and whether or not a steady diet of either type would wear the action of a Python out faster. Personally I only occasionally will slow cock the DA revolvers when I'm sighting in, and thereafter it's all DA shooting. Even though Pythons have the most glorious hammer spur ever put on a revolver, I'd just rather be able to enjoy the feel of all of the hand honing of the action that was done when the gun was crafted. Great story time, today a fellow along with his father, a long retired policeman, were shooting at the range next to me. My guess is the man was approaching his 80s but he looked to be in great health. Anyhow, the older man did some slow firing at the range stand next to me and I happened to look over and see he was shooting what looked like a nice nickle plated Python. I asked him if it was a Python and he replied yes, that it was his old duty revolver. He showed it to me, a well cared for police 4" Python from '67. Just a beaut of a gun. And the retired policeman could still group his shots quite respectably in the DA mode. Said he hadn't really shot much at all since he retired almost 25 years ago. I hope I'm still able to shoot that good when I'm 50!
 

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What can destroy the Python action (and all other revolvers) is shooting double action by jerking the trigger as hard and fast as you can.

Also, "force cocking" the hammer by yanking it back hard in single action.

Double action won't harm the Python as long as you take a little care be a little gentle.

You can shoot a Python fast, but few people know HOW to do this.
The technique is to "roll" the trigger NOT jerk it.

With a little practice to figure out how it's done, you can shoot DA fairly fast without tearing the gun up, like most people do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks and that's just plain good sense not to force a hammer or a trigger. I once before learned two hard lessons about that, firstly, dont do it or you'll be sorry, and secondly and more importantly, if you like your revolvers educate anyone else about how you like to treat your guns before you let them tear yours up. Where I do 95% of my shooting they wan't you to shoot slow and space your shots out anyhow or they'll kick you off the range. "NO FAST FIRING!" they always tell everyone. Even with my Ruger GP100 I go easy and especially since I shoot a lot of my own lead reloads, when I DA shoot if I feel any unnatural resistance to a trigger pull I back off, swing out the cylinder and make sure all the cartridges are sitting flush and not poking out because of a grain of unburned powder or bullet lube. That Ruger has been well cared for by me and is absolutely as tight as the day I bought it. The action is a bunch slicker though. It was purchased to be my main reliable home gun, not a toy to see how much I could abuse it since it's supposed to be so tough. I've seen GP100s that were shot loose and sloppy and it aint pretty. Any of my .357 loads are all mid-range 900-1050 FPS loads except for some of my 125gr JHP loads which barely push 1200 FPS out of that 4" barrel and are still less than factory pressure loads. For factory type .357 loads, I feel (and this is just my opinion which comes from years of loading factory pressure like .357 ammo) it's better to just go with factory ammo. At those higher pressures it's critical to have bullet seating, crimping, case length and all perfect. Get a tad out of spec or start mixing cases and substituting bullets of the same weight but different make or type and your basically wildcatting. Wildcatting is hard on any guns IMO.
 
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