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I did some horse trading as Dad used to say. I traded a rifle for an old Colt SAA. Somewhere in the emails I missed that the hammer will not stay back on full cock. It would not of been a deal breaker even if I did realize it.
I took it apart today as soon as I got it unrapped. I took my needle file and tried to make a notch. It was obvious that someone has tried this before as there are signs of file marks before mine. Lots of clean steel all around the blueing.

Who can weld up and make some notches that will last? I believe what I have done is temp at best and will not trust it to last. I want it fixed so I have faith in it with live ammo.

Thanks for pointing me twars a good Colt gunsmith.
 

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For future reference, those notches are stoned, not filed and done to a specific angle and depth. What does the sear on the trigger look like ? I'll bet the problem started with a broken or worn trigger sear. Send the gun tio Jim Martin or Lever Action Bill and let them sort it out. Both have the means to rebuild the hammer if needed. The hammer may be able to be salvaged without welding depending on how deep you filed the notch.
 

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I just raised my hammer re-build price to $200 after a man traveled all the way from Billings, MT to hand me two of his SAA’s to repair the hammers.

It’s the least “funnest” part of smithing I do - but I will admit seeing some of the old Colts is worth it.

The hammer needs hand-filed, in and out, in and out as to not change the sear spacing dimensions, then honed (I like the word polished better) and finally re-hardened to glass-like hardness.
 

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Peacemaker Specialist.com. Check out Eddie Janis website. Learn what is involved.. then make your decision on who you want to do it. You can get it good but not fast or you can get it fast but not good.
 

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I did some horse trading as Dad used to say. I traded a rifle for an old Colt SAA. Somewhere in the emails I missed that the hammer will not stay back on full cock. It would not of been a deal breaker even if I did realize it.
I took it apart today as soon as I got it unrapped. I took my needle file and tried to make a notch. It was obvious that someone has tried this before as there are signs of file marks before mine. Lots of clean steel all around the blueing.

Who can weld up and make some notches that will last? I believe what I have done is temp at best and will not trust it to last. I want it fixed so I have faith in it with live ammo.

Thanks for pointing me twars a good Colt gunsmith.
Whoever you chose to do this job, in general it would be best to send the hammer, trigger, and entire gun. The trigger sear may also need some rebuilding. The safety cock must be checked for firing pin clearance, the half cock position should leave a chamber almost centered within the gate channel. Also when the hammer is drawn back SLOWLY, the bolt should drop onto the lead-in groove, and as the hammer comes back further (SLOWLY), the trigger sear should engage the full cock notch as the cylinder is also being secured by the lock bolt. On this last sequence, slight differences on the cylinder ratchet may allow this hammer cocking/cylinder lockup to perform well on one chamber, but on other chambers the cylinder can lock before the hammer reaches full cock position. So that full cock notch must be finish-filed to accommodate all chambers (all cylinder positions) at the time of lockup.

I emphasize SLOWLY, because drawing back the hammer quickly to full cock can give the false indication that the cylinder/lock bolt/hammer full cock timing is all correct.

The person who does the work may have to also have to adjust the lock bolt timing to get everything right.

One other thing of importance, I personally do not like the concept of casehardening those hammer notches. An alloy rod can be used that provides adequate TOUGHNESS, not Rockwell C-65 hardness. Case hardened notches are very hard to adjust, making a file "Zing" across them. Case hardened notches also are more likely to result in brittle failure. The harder a steel becomes, the more brittle it is.

Mailing the entire gun to the experienced gun smith in this type of repair is a major imposition, I know! But when the work is completed, its done! And it's all done correctly.

BTW, a word to the wise, with BISLEYS it is imperative to send the entire gun for hammer/trigger work. A Bisley is not tolerant of hammer notch positions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I had a great conversation with Jim Martin today. I'm not sure how long I kept him away from his workbench but I really enjoyed shooting the sh#t with him. Looks like my old Colt will be in good hands.
 

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I had a great conversation with Jim Martin today. I'm not sure how long I kept him away from his workbench but I really enjoyed shooting the sh#t with him. Looks like my old Colt will be in good hands.
None better.

I've got another one going out to Jim in a few weeks.

Best regards,
 
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