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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of sets of Ivory Grips that I had gotten years ago from Nutmeg Sports. About every year and half I always take them off and place them in a small ziplock bag and put mineral oil on them to soak for a couple of days. What are some of the ways other Forum members use to keep them from drying out? So far this has sure worked for me.
 

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I have heard that vegetable oil was better than petroleum based oil, but have no real knowledge one way or the other. I have a Randall knife with an ivory handle that is 45 to 50 years old that has held up well with nothing special done to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have heard that vegetable oil was better than petroleum based oil, but have no real knowledge one way or the other. I have a Randall knife with an ivory handle that is 45 to 50 years old that has held up well with nothing special done to it.
I started out with vegetable oil, it leaves a sticky substance on the grips and gun. And this is with wiping the grips down well before putting them back on. The grips seem to age better with the mineral oil. IMO. Thanks for your reply. Dennis
 

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I like to seal Ivory with clear wax after all polish work is done, a good hard wax. Seal both inside the grip are as well as the exterior. While I like Renaissance you can also use Johnsons floor paste wax. It dries hard and makes a good seal. I have found over the years that humidity between locations can drive you nuts, fit grips in AZ and ship to LA and the they may pop off from the increase. Also fit them in humidity and bring them to 8% humidity in AZ and they get loose. Ivory easily accepts moisture, its part of its natural strength. I only use files to shape, keep any heat away as it will crack quickly. Time consuming but the best way. Q
 

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She uses some kind of nail and cuticle pen that is supposed to be really healthy for the skin and nails. I brushed a little on the ivory and rubbed it in and let it set. No sticky mess and I do that about once a year or so when I remember.
 

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There may some purpose in giving "treatments" to green ivory, not long removed from a live animal. OTOH grips I had made in Africa in 1951 have had no care at all, nada, beyond whatever care I give the pistol itself, which is wipe it off and store it in 50% or less humidity.

 

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From Nutmeg's website:

'3. I have heard that I have to remove my ivory if I plan on shooting my gun. Is this true?
Answer: Nothing could be further from the truth. That would be like selling somebody some hiking boots and telling them they can only wear them indoors. Ivory is one of the toughest grip materials available. Think about it. The elephant that wore this ivory tore down trees and unearthed large heavy stones with his tusks. Pool shooters would strike ivory Q balls as hard as they could sending them crashing into other ivory balls without damage. Usually people that spout stories regarding the fragility of ivory are selling wood or ivory look alike grips.

4. Will my ivory shrink or crack?
Answer: Ivory, just like wood, can shrink or crack over time. This can happen in especially dry or warm climates and especially if the ivory is not cared for. We include a full page of instructions regarding what steps an owner can take to assure that they get more than a lifetime of service and enjoyment from their grips.'
 

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I put mineral oil on dads ivory grips on his blackhawk, about once every year or year and a half. Just a drop or two and rub it in. The link posted in the first couple of replies here mentions to use mineral oil too.
 
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