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Annie Oakley TV show starring Gail Davis.
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In my posting about Al Frish buying a lot of Stembridge's inventory that he brought to my house to go thru was one of the guns that Gail Davis is holding ,a Paladin colt & one of John Wayne's colt's & some others that I can't remember.
 

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Supposedly the revolvers John Wayne carried in "The Shootist" were Great Westerns
Yes indeed. That pretty well documented as there are a lot of old publicity pics and articles floating around regarding that. There is a nice close up scene of the Duke using his engraved GW in the shoot out in the saloon. He used more than one gun in the movie.
I picked up the new EMF GW Shootist edition that is laser engraved. How could I not. Of course like in most things it was a year after the release since I didn't hear about it and it was hard to find a NIB at the time. It is a heck of a shooter too. Made me fall in love with Pietta revolver too.
 

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Supposedly the revolvers John Wayne carried in "The Shootist" were Great Westerns.
Yes, those were the second set made for him by Great Western, the two originally given to him by William Wilson of GW were 5 1/2", those were stolen from the Great Western display at a trade show in Chicago. Replacements were the 4 3/4" used in The Shootist, you can see the presentation case was made for 5 1/2" pistols.
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I think there is a transference in why we love the SAA. Those that lived the 1870s, used them, later wrote about it. As old men, they talked about it. Their kids heard about it. Then Hollywood acted it. But to Americans, the Western frontier was our great adventure, our manifest destiny, where men went to find a fortune and a life. It happened from 1776 until 1956, but we were self-made men. And hardship was our challenge and a small obstacle.

The last generation, yes, listened to Westerns and watched them. But their fathers read books about the times. And their fathers told stories. Sadly, the other great epics of America are being forgotten. The Revolution, the Civil War....all those things that each generation or two suffered, hardened, then tried to record. Today, it's the 50s Hollywood western. What about in 30 years?
 

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The last generation, yes, listened to Westerns and watched them. But their fathers read books about the times. And their fathers told stories. Sadly, the other great epics of America are being forgotten. The Revolution, the Civil War....all those things that each generation or two suffered, hardened, then tried to record. Today, it's the 50s Hollywood western. What about in 30 years?
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I think the SAA will have the same draw 30 years now. It is a gorgeous design that is aesthetically pleasing and can attach the owner to a variety of segments of our history.....cowboys, US Army, lawman, outlaw, pioneer, gambler etc. I also think in 30 years original M4 configurations will have their place similar to the SP1 of the Vietnam era.
 

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There has always been an allure of the SAA that outlived it's original market. It was a solid tool initially, not exactly groundbreaking at it's time because the top strap revolver had been around for awhile and the bored through cylinder had been around for awhile. WW2 seemed to be the closing act for the SAA, then Western themed movies and series kick started the interest again. From there the numbers made have ebbed and flowed but it's still here. Cowboy action shooting certainly provided a bump. But I think interest in the SAA is a natural evolution for a life-long gun collector. It's easy to see a new "gun guy" start with the latest polymer framed gun, then get a revolver, then get a yearning for an SAA. Maybe get an Italian clone first (which I did) and then have to get "the real thing". I think there is definitely still a great future in collecting and shooting these. Especially if CZ/Colt continues production - which makes a stepping stone between clones and out-of-production first and second generation guns. If Colt-made guns are no longer a production item it will drive up prices and make it more of a collectors game and prohibitively expensive except for clones. I am not a well-heeled collector by any means - I am a blue collar working man who has shot and collected all my adult life (and a few years before being an adult) - but time and effort has allowed me to get a good gathering of guns from third generation to first generation with both collector and shooter guns in first and third generation. One of my sons already has an interest in single actions (we gave him a Heritage 22 one Christmas as an early adult) and has shot and continues to shoot single actions with me. I hope all of you are cultivating an interest in younger people to keep this going.
 

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There has always been an allure of the SAA that outlived it's original market. It was a solid tool initially, not exactly groundbreaking at it's time because the top strap revolver had been around for awhile and the bored through cylinder had been around for awhile. WW2 seemed to be the closing act for the SAA, then Western themed movies and series kick started the interest again. From there the numbers made have ebbed and flowed but it's still here. Cowboy action shooting certainly provided a bump. But I think interest in the SAA is a natural evolution for a life-long gun collector. It's easy to see a new "gun guy" start with the latest polymer framed gun, then get a revolver, then get a yearning for an SAA. Maybe get an Italian clone first (which I did) and then have to get "the real thing". I think there is definitely still a great future in collecting and shooting these. Especially if CZ/Colt continues production - which makes a stepping stone between clones and out-of-production first and second generation guns. If Colt-made guns are no longer a production item it will drive up prices and make it more of a collectors game and prohibitively expensive except for clones. I am not a well-heeled collector by any means - I am a blue collar working man who has shot and collected all my adult life (and a few years before being an adult) - but time and effort has allowed me to get a good gathering of guns from third generation to first generation with both collector and shooter guns in first and third generation. One of my sons already has an interest in single actions (we gave him a Heritage 22 one Christmas as an early adult) and has shot and continues to shoot single actions with me. I hope all of you are cultivating an interest in younger people to keep this going.
My son also, and I feel very lucky to have one that’s interestEd in the Colts, most seem to be going to the plastic ones quick fire ones! Dennis
 

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My son also, and I feel very lucky to have one that’s interestEd in the Colts, most seem to be going to the plastic ones quick fire ones! Dennis
Yes, indeed! . . . . .
When at the local gun shop where I used to hang out, I was amazed at some/most of the customers that were shopping for a handgun . . . . .
ALMOST the very first question they had was, “How many rounds does it hold?”
At the range, they are also of the “blaster” and “spray ‘n pray” crowd! (Gotta’ wonder where they get the financing for the ammo.)
 

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This, this is why WE are so enamored with the Colt Single Action Army.

A shot of John Wayne and Kirk Douglas in the movie ‘War Wagon’
Here Douglas says “mine hit the ground first” John Wayne relies: mine was taller.
It’s the epitome of comparing one’s manhood in a comical way.

It conjures up images and fantasy of being the good guy or the antagonist in the Old West - staving off the bad guys overrunning the town or saving the beauty in distress.

This is why we spend money that could put a new car in the driveway.

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My Dad used to say that holding a Single Action was Like Shaking the Hand of an old Friend
 

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I love them because my first pistol was an 1880 Colt in .45 SAA I paid $375.00 worth of lawn mowing money for and of course that was because my first pistol shooting experience was with the .45 SAA my aunt’s Daddy carried as a County Sheriff in the I.T. In the 1890’s. The movies sure didn’t have an adverse affect. My favorite scene though has to do with a ‘73 Winchester; “I got a question, how you planning on getting back down that hill?”
 

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I got into King modified Colts about 5 years go. This led to finding and buying an SAA with a King rib on it. I am slightly too young for the Westerns era. I had little interest in SAAs at that point. But getting one changed everything. Feeling the weight in hand, how easily it points and maybe most importantly the way it clicks when you work the action, the loading and unloading, made me understand the obsession. I’m coming at this from the opposite angle of some; I have the guns and now Westerns have more appeal.

Shooting at the range is a big hobby of mine. I prefer target shooting with good sights. This is not what the SAA excels at but they're so fun to hold, point and use that I just bought my 2nd one.
 

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BOGE............I just have to say I'm sorry you have missed so much in life that is reflected in Western movies.
I believe for many, especially my self, they (Western movies) have been some of the most enjoyable hours of my life......
That may sound strange to you but others understand.
TR
 
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