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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a set of Wilson Combat 684B grip screw bushings and installed them in a vintage Colt Series 70 1911. All of the bushings extend into the mag well such that I cannot insert the magazine. Has anyone else ever had this problem? Did I buy the wrong model bushings?

I plan to all Wilson Combat on Monday but wondering if this is a first.
 

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This is just my opinion and you know what that is worth, but if it were me, I would grind the Bushing end down so it is flush with the side of the Mag well. Then apply some RED LockTite to keep them in place. With the Red Locktite, you can remove the Bushings with a little heat applied to the Bushing area.

I know the best way is to use the Staking Tool, but sometimes the "down and dirty" way does work well
 

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This is just my opinion and you know what that is worth, but if it were me, I would grind the Bushing end down so it is flush with the side of the Mag well. Then apply some RED LockTite to keep them in place. With the Red Locktite, you can remove the Bushings with a little heat applied to the Bushing area.

I know the best way is to use the Staking Tool, but sometimes the "down and dirty" way does work well
Yes and that works just fine too.
Personally I do not remember any being so long as to interfere with the magazine, so I assumed that the Wilson ones are made to be staked in place. And even when staked in place they do come lose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the responses. I did not know they were intended to be staked in place. I will take my chances on my knife stones to remove some metal. I will post pictures of the bushing protruding this morning. Those threads are so fine that if the bushings were staked in place, the next bushing replacement would damage the frame in my opinion.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I did not know they were intended to be staked in place. I will take my chances on my knife stones to remove some metal. I will post pictures of the bushing protruding this morning. Those threads are so fine that if the bushings were staked in place, the next bushing replacement would damage the frame in my opinion.
Apparently not the military did it for years.
I have replaced several over the years and to this day do not own the tap or the oversized tap to chase or repair the frame threads.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I did not know they were intended to be staked in place. I will take my chances on my knife stones to remove some metal. I will post pictures of the bushing protruding this morning. Those threads are so fine that if the bushings were staked in place, the next bushing replacement would damage the frame in my opinion.
pullstart,

You are correct that with staking, there would be some damage to the frame/threads when removing the Bushing! I have only had to replace 1 set of Bushings and I used LockTite and it worked for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, I have replaced grip bushing before and I have never staked them. Knowledge is power. I never knew they were staked in the first place. I dug around and found the old bushing and they were indeed staked. This project started when I tried to remove some wood grips and the grip screws did not turn but rather they bushings backed out. I had to put them in a vice to remove the screws. The threads in the frame are in good condition. The new bushings are nice and tight, just a tad bit long. If staking them is the best solution I no problem gearing up to go that route. Rather odd that the screws decided to turn the bushings rather than the screws coming loose. See the attached photos.
 

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That's what usually happens. The stock or grip screw gets snugged up against the stocks and when the screw is loosened the bushing turns.
Remember back in the 1900's they didn't have Loctite or threadlocker, so the military wanted a way to preserve the frame threads from repeated disassembly and reassembly so Colt used the bushing, and to keep it from turning it was staked in place.
Even if you decide to stake them, I'd still use the Loctite.
 

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I wouldn't stake them. Some Loctite blue should be just fine or red if your really worried! I'm guessing here, but suspect staking occurred before the use of Loctite.
 

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You could have staked those new bushings till the cows came home and it would not have solved the problem you were having with them standing proud in the magwell. They still need to be at least flush to not interfere with the mag insertion. You needed to shorten them as you did. Now staking them or using Loctite to keep them from coming back out is a whole other issue.

Personally I would have just used another pair of bushings that didn't protrude into the grip...but I keep a lot of these around.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's exactly why I decided to just take the extra metal down and use the thread locker. I feared that if I bought the tool, staked them, and then they were still too long I would have a mess on my hands. I did not want to have to file them in place. I special ordered those bushings so I did not have any extras.
 
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