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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up an 1892 in 38-40 today at a local shop, was someone's hunting gun - the wood was painted over (which appears to have preserved the wood) and had a healthy dose of brown patina. I carefully removed the screws for the stock and the crescent buttplate, and got the buttstock off and put stripper on it. It removed the paint (which stuck around pretty good, it took two hours of recoating and scrubbing to get it all off. I managed to keep the dark patina that comes with walnut aging for 120 years, and it had not been sanded previously. I tried to get the magazine tube out - the cross pin came out easy but never could get the screw for the magazine cap out. I plan on drilling it out and getting another screw - but there are two different screws listed - a long and a short. The long screw version extends out into a divot on the barrel. Obviously, I want to do as little damage as possible. Am I to assume that the originals like this use the long screw, and that is the reason I can't get the tube out? There is a little rust between the tube and barrel, as this gun was used for it's original purposes - I have a feeling it kept someone's freezer filled with deer during it's heyday. The bore is dang near perfect, and the rust on the exterior is super fine. I used a copper penny and Remoil and it looks very good now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Colts and Winchesters just naturally go together and I hope someone here is able to answer your question but if not go here ForumWinchester Collector and you'll get all the help you need.
I just added a post there as a guest, and it's in the administration queue. You are correct - I am fixing up an old Colt SAA from about the same vintage in 38 WCF and could not turn down the 1892 that is close in age. Mine is a rifle and not a carbine, I have ammo, and will get shot when I through with it. The action is very smooth and there is no slack - I have seen other guns like it that had problems cocking when the lever is cycled due to stretching apart of the receiver. This one is tight and looks to have been carried in the woods and shot sparingly.
 

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Before drilling out anything, you might try soaking the end of the barrel/magazine tube in a 50/50 mixture of ATF and Acetone for several days and try again. Use a well-fitting hollow ground screwdriver and apply some torque to the screw while rapping the back of the handle with a hammer. If still stuck, apply some heat.
I have an attic-find 1890 '73 Winchester rifle in 38-40 that had more frozen screws than not frozen. I used various combinations of all of the above to get it down to parts and pieces. The only screw I had to drill out was the dust cover screw.
 

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Also, a little heat never hurts. Not enough to get the metal hot enough to discolor, but enough to break the screw loose.

When removing the magazine tube there is a good chance that you will scratch it as it comes through the retainer at the front of the barrel. If it has never been removed most often they have to be rotated back and forth while appling pressure, and the rust inside the retainer scratches them. My suggestion is to remove it only if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I posted while at work on third shift, so I will have to get some pictures of the gun that are decent. I did figure out that the plug is the "no lip" version and that the screw should be long. Someone had already messed up the slot in the plug, so I am thinking heavily about getting a good used plug and a screw and machining the screw out (I have the equipment and tools to do so). I put a little gel stain on the stock, it evened out and deepened the patina. I have to figure out a good top coat that doesn't look "new" to keep the overall patina of the gun.
 

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Use a butane lighter, not a torch.
I used a heat gun on low setting most of the time.
It also worked pretty well (holding it a bit farther away and constantly moving) to bring oil to the surface of soaked stocks and forends.
 

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A hairdryer is what I use after soaking it in your favorite concoction in 25F weather in my garage for eight hours. Bring it in and apply the heat around the stuck screw.

Heat guns even on low settings can cause damage, except when used by an expert like 'MarkinTx'.
Yellow Font Gas Symmetry Pattern
 
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I picked up an 1892 in 38-40 today at a local shop, was someone's hunting gun - the wood was painted over (which appears to have preserved the wood) and had a healthy dose of brown patina. I carefully removed the screws for the stock and the crescent buttplate, and got the buttstock off and put stripper on it. It removed the paint (which stuck around pretty good, it took two hours of recoating and scrubbing to get it all off. I managed to keep the dark patina that comes with walnut aging for 120 years, and it had not been sanded previously. I tried to get the magazine tube out - the cross pin came out easy but never could get the screw for the magazine cap out. I plan on drilling it out and getting another screw - but there are two different screws listed - a long and a short. The long screw version extends out into a divot on the barrel. Obviously, I want to do as little damage as possible. Am I to assume that the originals like this use the long screw, and that is the reason I can't get the tube out? There is a little rust between the tube and barrel, as this gun was used for it's original purposes - I have a feeling it kept someone's freezer filled with deer during it's heyday. The bore is dang near perfect, and the rust on the exterior is super fine. I used a copper penny and Remoil and it looks very good now.
If it is the long screw, then it goes into a shallow hole in the barrel. If it is the short screw, then that screw does not have to be removed. You can twist the mag tube and pull loose from the frame and out of the fore end.
 

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Does your magazine end cap have a lip on it that enters a slot on the barrel? A few 92s did. Pirkle states most rifles with full length magazine tubes used the long screw with the unthreaded shank going into the divot in the barrel, but that there is no rhyme or reason as to what type of endcap or long/short screw the assembler could have used. If you DO drill that screw out then it may be that the unthreaded shank would remain behind rust locked in place! I would certainly give it a rather long Kroil soak before I drilled it out. Great job on the stock by the way!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Does your magazine end cap have a lip on it that enters a slot on the barrel? A few 92s did. Pirkle states most rifles with full length magazine tubes used the long screw with the unthreaded shank going into the divot in the barrel, but that there is no rhyme or reason as to what type of endcap or long/short screw the assembler could have used. If you DO drill that screw out then it may be that the unthreaded shank would remain behind rust locked in place! I would certainly give it a rather long Kroil soak before I drilled it out. Great job on the stock by the way!
Mine does not have the lip. I was thinking the same thing about the remaining portion of the screw - I would probably have to drill down just far enough in the screw to remove the threaded portion, then drill the front of the plug and try to pry up to remove the leftovers of the screw. There is a decent ding in the tube and it has rust on it at the barrel, I have thought about just milling off the entire end of the tube and replacing tube, cap, and screw - they aren't terribly expensive if I get new production stuff. The gun has no true collectors value, it is the most common configuration and the second most prevalent caliber - a decent looking and functioning gun would be good.

Thanks for the compliments on the stock. I found I had an old tin can of Minwax Antique Oil finish (BLO + Varnish) - so I started putting a top coat on. If it starts getting shiny I will dull it a little.

I don't have another vintage lever action (oldest is a Marlin 336 I bought brand new in 1984 as a teenager) - I had a Marlin 1894 in 32-20 but the bore was completely roached and shot minute of broad side of a barn. This one came across my radar, and when I worked the action and saw the bore I had to get it.
 

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Also, remember the earlier Winchester magazine tubes were not really a tube, they were a piece of sheet metal rolled onto a mandrel. Have you tried a screw jack? If you dont have one (easy to make) you can use a drill press or a mill: clamp the rifle in the drill vise with the screw under the chuck. In the chuck is a one of those hexagon shaped screw driver bits that exactly fits the slot (grind to size until it fits exactly). Bring the quill down and apply a bit of pressure to keep the bit in the slot,then lock the quill at that height. Turn the chuck by hand and try to break the screw free. If a small portion of the bit shank is sticking out you can put a small wrench on it and apply torque that way. Obviously you don't want to turn the power on! Just break it free then take it out and do the rest the normal way. One of two things WILL happen: the screw will come free or you will break off either half the top of the screw or the entire screw head. I use it as a method of last resort if I am going to destroy the screw anyway....this way there is a chance.
 
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