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I'm interested in trying my hand at bullseye. I'm very new to the sport so perhaps it's just a lack of exposure to the norms but I never hear much talk about the Woodsman for use in Bullseye. Are they just not used much or am I mistaken?

How does the Woodsman Match Target stack up against the Ruger MKIV, not just in accuracy but fit and finish? I have a MKIV Competition and while a fun pistol to shoot, I'm not all that impressed with the fit and finish. The upper rattles like an AR15 and at less than 1k rounds, the bolt face is peened up... apparently a common problem caused by the bolt stop.

Did any of the Woodmans get the hand fit treatment?

I haven't handled many and it's been a long time since I've even seen one.
 

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In fit and finish, the Woodsman is from another era, when those things mattered a lot. Comparing it to a Ruger is like comparing an Early American windsor chair to an Ikea put together yourself chair.
Accuracy, it's the luck of the draw, you may get a good one, or a worn out one with an antique, 50 year old Colt. With a Ruger, you may get an accurate one, or not so accurate, because of automated manufacturing flaws that crop up and aren't noticed.

If you want a good .22 Auto for Bullseye, get a High Standard Trophy or a Browning Medalist, or a Hammerli.
 

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In fit and finish, the Woodsman is from another era, when those things mattered a lot. Comparing it to a Ruger is like comparing an Early American windsor chair to an Ikea put together yourself chair.
Accuracy, it's the luck of the draw, you may get a good one, or a worn out one with an antique, 50 year old Colt. With a Ruger, you may get an accurate one, or not so accurate, because of automated manufacturing flaws that crop up and aren't noticed.

If you want a good .22 Auto for Bullseye, get a High Standard Trophy or a Browning Medalist, or a Hammerli.
Another good choice is the S&W M-41. If you have deep pockets, the Walther GSP would be an outstanding choice.
 

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I suppose the difference in accuracy between a Colt MT Woodsman that is in excellent shape, an S&W Model 41, a Browning Medalist and a High Standard Trophy is so minute to be more of how good the shooter is than how accurate the gun is. The Hammerli and Walther GSP take it to another level.

If you just plan on competing for fun at your local league or gun club, any of them would serve you well. I have a 1950 MT Woodsman with the 4.5" barrel that I bought from an older gentleman. He said he used to compete at his local gun club and won a few trophies or awards with it. Then he got in a car wreck and broke both of his wrists and that was the end of his shooting for competition days. The action is smooth as silk and the trigger is outstanding. I'm sure that it still shoots much better than my eyes can see.
 

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A Ruger with the heavy barrel will outshoot the Colt - hands down.

The Woodsman slide moves - the Ruger's doesn't, and is a stable shooting platform.

High Standards are accurate as well, as are the S&Ws - the military used all three in training and competition.
 

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I have an early Ruger MkI that I got through the NRA/DCM. It has the edge in accuracy over any of the Colt .22's I have or have owned. Jim Clark built his own version of the MkI that was extremely accurate.

If target shooting, accuracy over appearance.
 

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I agree with you Tom. Nothing and I mean nothing like the beautiful work done by Kings Gun Works to the first series Woodsman but here is my very feeble attempt that I did about 40 years ago. A reshaped MT bbl mated to a standard first series frame, a full length ventilated rib with a Bomar style rear sight and extended front sight, a second series mainspring housing with the oversized Colt military grips. Added a grip adapter. Removed the rear sight from the slide and made a blank to hide the dovetail. I all did this work on a 1 inch belt sander and files, the rib is made out of a piece of keystock. Had it parkerized too. Used it a bunch for 25 yd silhouette steel chicken matches that a indoor range ran weekly. Ten relays of 5 rds/5 chickens knocked off of a 4x4. Most chickens off the 4x4 won the money. Loved winning with my 1922 vintage pistol. And before I get beat up by the purists the original bbl was already cut.
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I’m sure I could do better now that I’ve got a mini mill.
 

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I bought a Colt Match Target made in 1973. Very accurate and feeds everything. I sold my S&W Model 41 after shooting the Colt for awhile. The Colt for me is just the best. I have sold all my Mark series also. Just no comparison for me. The Colt is the one I am keeping.
 

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In the early 80's I started shooting Bullseye and shot my first series target, everyone was amazed that I would wear that nice pistol out. A club member had a chane to buy a browning medalist and he had a S&W model 41 with 4 magazines he wanted to sell, I bought it and kept the woodsman fro my woods gun. The S&W shot very well.

Craig in CT.
 
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I shot this 3 shot group benchrested at 25 yards yesterday. A fluke? Probably, but an indicator that this pistol wants to shoot. A normal day this pistol does average around 3/4" groups with match ammo.... although yesterday these Blazers performed well. In my experience, Woodsman's are dang fine shooters and will hang with most others.
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A Ruger with the heavy barrel will outshoot the Colt - hands down.

The Woodsman slide moves - the Ruger's doesn't, and is a stable shooting platform.
While that's the theory, it hasn't been my experience at the range. The slide may move, but it's not flopping around up there. Colt built them right, and a MT that hasn't been damaged will out-shoot pretty much anything Ruger makes today.
 

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If you look at them, the Woodsman, High Standard, Browning blockback .22s are very similar designs. High Standard refined the design for removable barrels, sometimes had an external hammer, changed the grip angle to match the 1911, had very adjustable triggers, and much more over the decades, and was the one shot in Bullseye matches post war.

But I agree all shoot about the same if you selected good ones of any make. A good, mirror like barrel is what's important, if you're shooting a vintage arm compared to a modern make with a brand new barrel (Ruger).

My High Standard 106 Trophy is the most accurate .22 I own.
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