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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is the 1912 Model 1911 I inquired about back in February. It found its way to my windowsill. Based on the prior thread it appeared that everything was original, except the later two-tone magazine and the missing grip screws. I added some basic screws that allegedly came off of a 1918 model, which were listed on eBay.

Here is the link I posted in February with the gun field stripped. https://www.coltforum.com/forums/colt-semiauto-pistols/354189-1912-model-1911-thoughts.html

The gun also came with a WWII M1916 holster produced by Texas Tanning & Manufacturing Co. I need to figure how to safely remove the verdigris from the leather.













 

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Great looking gun! Verdigris is nasty stuff. I often scrape it off and it reappears a year or so later. Sometimes you can just use a cotton cloth and wipe it hard and it will be removed to an acceptable level. It is the rust of brass. It eventually will eat away enough brass so the rivet will fail. I have seen a few eaten in half. It is the reaction of the tanning chemical in the leather with the brass. It never seems to affect steel.
 

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Try not to spread the verdigris when you clean it off. It is virtually impossible to remove it from the leather if it gets wiped in. As mentioned above, a toothpick works for removing the worst, and then carefully clean with a rag.

It is not uncommon to see brads separated and pushed off the leather if the verdigris is allowed to develop. Occasionally you will see pistol or revolver stocks with verdigris growing around the medallions in wood stocks.
 

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Fingernails or a toothpick will take care of verdigris. ..A coat of Renaissance wax afterwards will help keep it in check..
Just bear in mind that the verdigris is toxic. Be sure and scrub fingernails if that is your tool of choice.

The verdigris forms between the copper alloy metal and the leather, and pushes out. Not much you can do to prevent the formation of the verdigris.

The frog on this Model 1907 sling has been partially pushed off the leather by the growth of the verdigris. I dug out what I could, but the damage was already done.

 

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Sweet very early 1911. I can attest to the toxicity of verdigris, once you've been verdigris poisoned you'll never make that mistake again, I know I won't. Be very careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I would try a small test area first as the mix may discolor the leather.
I tried it with mixed results. The area with strong color was not affected. However, the area around the grommet at the bottom of the holster where the tie feeds through was essentially bare, porous leather. As the photo shows, the finish had been rubbed away there. The cleaner left a dark circle around the grommet (I'm hoping it may fade as the area dries). Given the age of the holster and the various existing blemishes, it doesn't look out of place. However, I suggest that anyone with similar issues just carefully use a toothpick.
 
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