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Knowing that former mayor Steve Reed was not a knowledgeable collector, I am sceptical about these firearms. Unfortunately, the article does not specify what model handgun or what model long gun were sold.
The article does mention that many of these items have no provenance or authenticity. Sounds like a crap shoot to me.

Wyatt Earp pistol fetches $35,000 at Harrisburg auction | PennLive.com
 

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From that last picture, it doesn't look like anybody showed up.....and Malysh and Ratzo, you're right, without provenance it is a crapshoot.
 

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WOW. I wonder what that 35000$ gun would bring if it was just the Gun itself with no known connection to anyone famous.
Would it be $10,000,or less?
Or Is it possible that the gun maybe is still worth 35000$ to any serious collector just because of its condition and age and model?
I am not familiar with the going prices on a gun like that so I wouldn't know. It sure seems like a lot though.
 

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Don't know whether the story was true or not, but after Jessie Jams death people would approach Mr. James to see if she had one of Jessie's guns they could buy. Sure enough she did, and when she was sold out she would buy some more.
 

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Both Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson were known for picking up old revolvers, and selling them to admirers - along with the tale - whenever money was needed.

Frank James had a barrel full of old revolvers in his mother's outbuilding - she sold them as the opportunity presented itself, and did so up until her death.

These old boys weren't the only ones who did so, in a time when there was no way to disprove anything.

That's why 'provenance' became so important.

For many gun shows, Bobby McNellis - the now-deceased owner of El Paso Saddlery - used to carry a Colt's 'Lightning' with a tag reading 'This Is The Only Colt's Lightning Not Owned By Billy the Kid'.
 

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Interesting you should mention Bobby.I have a Bisley 38-40 he owned that was owned by an El Paso policeman and used to kill a Mexican who had shot the policeman's brother (US agent) in a shootout on the border in 1928.The brother died the next day.Bobby had researched the gun.
 

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McNelllis had a stack of John Wesley Hardin attorney at law in El Paso business cards. I remember when you could buy them at the gun shows for $75.00
 

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Both Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson were known for picking up old revolvers, and selling them to admirers - along with the tale - whenever money was needed.

Frank James had a barrel full of old revolvers in his mother's outbuilding - she sold them as the opportunity presented itself, and did so up until her death.

These old boys weren't the only ones who did so, in a time when there was no way to disprove anything.

That's why 'provenance' became so important.
If you had one of these types of guns, I bet it would still bring a pretty penny...IF you could prove it actually went through the famous person's hands. Although some provenance can be pretty airtight, I think it would be pretty hard to prove something like this, if not impossible.

For many gun shows, Bobby McNellis - the now-deceased owner of El Paso Saddlery - used to carry a Colt's 'Lightning' with a tag reading 'This Is The Only Colt's Lightning Not Owned By Billy the Kid'.
+1
 
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