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Discussion Starter #1
I went to the gunshop today to pick up my Diamondback that I have been raving about. This shop is run by a husband and wife, I deal with the wife all the time, I like her personality and she is very friendly. Well her husband was working in the shop today and he said to me "Did my wife tell you the gun has been reblued?" I said "WHAT", He called her and she said she didn't know the gun was reblued either. I told him I really was not crazy about a reblued gun , he said it's ok and gave me the money back and put it back in the showcase.If I would have dealt with the wife I would of ended up with that gun thinking it was original and would have never taken a shot out of it.Guess I could stop looking for those Diamondback grips now.I knew something was weird when I saw that gun in that condition with the box but with aftermarket grips.I will still deal with the wife I honestly believe she didn't know it was reblued.
 

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You are dealing with honest folks. I would look very closely at that gun to confirm that it is a re-blue. There really aren't that many re-blues around with Diamondbacks. Do a "show me or teach me" question to the owner concerning the gun.
 

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It sounds to me that you have a very reasonable dealer (husband). He could have said nothing at all and you would have gone off happy as a lark with your Diamondback.

Spotting a reblued gun is sometimes real easy and other times much more difficult. One thing I don't remember seeing on this forum is a complete explanation on how to identify a reblued gun. Telltale signs, what to look for, dead give aways, subtle clues, etc. Anyone up for the assignment?
 

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[ QUOTE ]
You are dealing with honest folks. I would look very closely at that gun to confirm that it is a re-blue. There really aren't that many re-blues around with Diamondbacks. Do a "show me or teach me" question to the owner concerning the gun.

[/ QUOTE ]

I concure that I'd find it difficult to believe the gun is a reblue due to age. The seller may be trying to back out of the deal or drive the price higher. No better way to turn off the buyer. They may have figured after quoting you the price that they quoted too low. They may also have a higher offer. I'd go back and look closer at the finish. Go in with a open mind as it may be a re-blue. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The dealer said he would bring in some of his that are NIB so I can see the difference side by side.
 

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Well I can give "some" advice and help, but it takes to actually "see" the gun , in GOOD daylight, to have an "idea" what and how the company did and used before ,so you can now 'note' the difference.
I too find it a bit hard to hear that this gun was 'reblued' but who are we to say "otherwise", just hope he's being straight up with you and I would take someone I know and trust to go and "look at the gun together". A second opinion doesn't hurt.

Other than the 'obvious' color differences I noted before, the rollmarks, (stampings)on the guns frame, barrel, slide, etc, should be crisp and NOT shallowed out (washed out looking) or "dished", all numbers and letters should "look" and feel like they are "supposed", if dished or washed out screw holes appear, this is a sign of "buffing and polishing" that was aggressive or "too hard" ( too long also!)Screws should NOT be "distorted" and the slots crooked or too wide,and uneven.(again, screws can be changed!)
Corners should NOT be "rounded", sides of slides should be "square" flat and NOT wavy or again, 'dished out'.
Polishing marks or the "grain" is something that each company does the "same" all the time, so when you "see" the marks going in 'other ' directions, this should make you take 'notice'. Look at the gun slanted away from you and turn it slowly ,looking down the sides and out along the barrel, on LONG guns , this will be very obvious in good lighting.IN the rear, look at the inside of the forcing cone, it should be in the white or dirty/gray.
Look down the bore and into the chambers, they shouldn't be "blued", they should be gray and dirty,or 'shiny'white, but this can be "hidden" by just shooting the gun a few times after the work is done.
Also there should be NO blue on 'wear spots', crane front and rear on the ratchets, and against the front of the frame on the inside and against the recoil shield in the rear. Again, you can be "tricked " here. Like on the Ruger single actions the 'boss' of the cylinder should be in the 'white' polished from "fitting" to the gun.

All in all, the basic "color", screw holes, stampings"washed out" and edges 'sharp' are the key things to look for.
NOW, the 'secret', NO gun company ever blued over any pits, if you see any spots or pitting ANYWHERE on the gun, especially mingled in ,among the lettering (writing) they cannot remove these, as then the writting would have to "go" or get 'thinned' or entirely 'missing' ( like the Rampant Stallion on th eside of the slide on a Colt auto pistol, and you see these pits and they are "blued" ,it's been "reblued", the cardinal sin of a "bad blue job". Right up there with using a "wire wheel" to remove the old finish! You KNOW when you see this occur.Yikes, scary!
Yes, there are many great guys out there doing work that is top notch, A-1 and yes, a very few times I was even fooled, but I have been to many of the factories and have been bluing/refinishing and restoring guns for over 30 years ,in 3 different shops, so I can "usually" tell.
They do NOT use the same chemicals today to blue guns, and the factories do NOT put the time and the effort into a 'Masterblue' job like the Colts or S&W's of days gone by, time ,money, (Labor intensive, hand-work) and the 'EPA" won't allow for any 'toxic stuff'.
Cyanides and stuff like that was used to "set bluing" way back is NO more. Yes, they can do this to some extent in Italy and South America and get away with it , but we can't ,so they are looking for different ways to give the appearances (Ruger with a chemical coat to the Vaqueros) Turnbull with a temperature change/process to give the 'colors, but NOT the 'case hardening' like the old days, etc.
From what I know 'Dulite Corp' is supplying the vast majority of the gun companies with the chemicals and the process, but the prep, buffing and polishing is left to the companies. The finishes are 'darker' more black, almost like the 'black oxide' and this is for a reason, it is more forgiving, easier to work with and gives and a more durable, lasting finish.
The 'custom' boys do the 'specializing' and can do it well and on an individual basis, but it is "costly" but well worth the price, due to the time and effort that goes into the "job". DelGreco refinishes are just as "valuable" on a Parker shotgun , as the 'original', for example.

If you want to have a "nice" gun ,the factory can provide for a refinish and keep the documentation (work order) as provenance that the work was indeed 'factory' and you will protect your investment in the long run.

This by NO means is complete, but an "offhand" from the top of my head, because to look and know, each gun has their "own" story to tell and is the only right way to 'check each on it's own merits and pitures do help, BUT in this day of 'digital' can be easily 'doctored', so "caveat emptor"................................. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 
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